Category Archives: University of Hamburg – BWL

University of Hamburg – Behavioral & Experimental Economics (PhD Course)

(The course takes place on four Fridays. Sessions are scheduled in both the winter term and the summer term, such that participants have sufficient time to develop and run their experiments)

14th December 2018, 18th January 2019, 22nd February, 7th June

10:00 – 16:00 h

Universität Hamburg (more details follow)

Course Instructor: Prof. Dr. Markus Nöth and Prof. Dr. Guido Voigt (both UHH)

Course Value: 2 SWS or 5 LP

Teaching language: English

Registration: guido.voigt@uni-hamburg.de, (First come, first-served)

Objectives:
The main goal of this course is to introduce the design and implementation of both laboratory and field experiments in various fields of Economics and Business Administration. PhD students who have some experience with or who consider to set up an experiment are welcome to participate in this course.

First, we will identify different research questions for a laboratory or a field experiment. We start with discussing critical theory assumptions. We then show how research hypotheses can be inferred from behavioral models and how these hypotheses may be tested in lab or field studies.

Second, participants will critically discuss an experimental paper (either provided by us or self-selected) that is instructive for their own research field.

Third, participants will develop an experimental design and conduct a pilot experiment
that is run in class. We introduce basic statistics along with a discussion how they relate
to the experimental design.

Participants have the option to take a research ethics training (https://about.citiprogram.org/en/homepage/) that becomes increasingly important to conduct research projects with colleagues from the Unites States. All students will learn the basic requirements of a human subjects committee.

Some topics:

  • Identify a suitable research question for an experiment
  • Ethical and scientific standards: historical and scientific reasons, consent requirements,
    human subjects committee, special requirements (children, elderly people, inmates, …), data collection and evaluation
  • Individual and group experiments in the laboratory
  • Surveys and internet experiments
  • Field experiments in cooperation with a company

Schedule (tentative)

Day Topics Suggested Readings
1st SessionIntroduction to the field

Game theoretic models, critical assumptions, Behavioral Models and
Research Hypothesis

Laboratory Experiments
Katok 2012
2nd SessionPresentation and discussion of assigned papers.

Statistics & Design Choices

IRB, Field-Experiments
Baum 2006,
Sheskin 2011
3rd SessionPresentation of research (Problem Description, Research Hypothesis, Experimental design)

Visit of Experimentallabor (z-Tree, Eye-Tracking, etc.)
4th SessionPresentation of pilot studies (Note: Pilot studies need to be scheduled independently by participants)

Prerequisites:
Basic background in microeconomics, game theory and statistics.

Student evaluation:

  • Critical discussion of an experimental paper, experiment design presentation (extended summary on economic question, relevant literature, hypotheses, design: presentation with max. 10 slides or max. five pages extended abstract).
  • Running a pilot experiment is optional, but encouraged.

Recommended Texts:
Statistical analysis
Baum, C. F. 2006. An introduction to modern econometrics using Stata. Stata press
Camerer, C, 2003, Behavioral Game Theory, Princeton University Press.
Kagel, J. and A. Roth, 1995, Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University
Press.
Sheskin, D. J. 2011. Handbook of parametric and nonparametric statistical procedures.
5. ed. CRC Press.
How to design laboratory experiments
Katok, E. 2012. Using laboratory experiments to build better operations management
models. Foundations and trends in technology, information and operations management 5(1) 1–88.

Other material (e.g., papers to be presented etc.) will be distributed once we know
who participates

University of Hamburg – School of Business: Recent developments in audit research and an approach to getting published

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course Instructor: Professor Nicole Ratzinger-Sakel (UHH)

Course Value: 2 SWS or 4 LP

Block course:
20 February, 2019 – 22 February, 2019,
Time: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Location: tba

Language of instruction: English

Application: Please send a current CV until January 12, 2019 to nicole.ratzingersakel@uni-hamburg.de.

Course Overview:
The main objectives of this PhD course include:

  • Introduce students to recent developments in audit research; hereby students will get
    knowledge about a selection of audit research papers recently published in highly ranked academic journals.
  • In addition, the course will enhance students’ ability to critically review the quality of research papers which is a meaningful element of the double-blind review process and extremely important for the quality of their own work. To do so, students will get an idea which “list” reviewers typically follow. Students are further expected to present and critically discuss papers that will be assigned to them.
  • Students will further get advices to getting their work published.
  • Finally, students should present their (first ideas of) own (audit) research ideas during the
    course.

Student evaluation: Presentation and critical discussion of assigned papers (papers will be
assigned to students after their application; each student is expected to present and critically
discuss one paper).

University of Hamburg – School of Business: Risk adjustment methods for quality of care outcomes with administrative data

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Hamburg Center for Health Economics

Course Instructors: Prof. Dr. Marco Caliendo / Prof. Dr. Tom Stargardt

Course Value: 5 ECTS

Block course:
24.09.2018: 9:00 am ‐ 12:30 pm / 01:30 pm ‐ 05:00 pm
25.09.2018: 9:00 am ‐ 12:30 pm / 01:30 pm ‐ 05:00 pm
26.09.2018: 9:00 am ‐ 12:30 pm / 01:30 pm ‐ 05:00 pm

Place: Universität Hamburg

Classroom: 4029, Esplanade 36

Language of instruction: English

Registration: Please contact  Elena Phillips, elena.phillips@wiso.uni-hamburg.de (first come, first-served)

Course Overview:
The course will cover methods for drawing causal inference in interventional, non‐
experimental/non‐randomized studies on quality of care with administrative data. In order to control for confounders between intervention and control group, at first simple methods (such as stratification and standardization) as well as advanced methods (Propensity Score Matching, Difference‐in‐Differences, Regression‐Discontinuity Designs) are taught. The course will also give an overview on common risk‐adjustment instruments (generic and disease specific risk‐adjustment scores based on diagnoses or ATC codes) for use with health outcomes.

The course will be split in theoretical and practical sessions. During the practical sessions we are going to implement the discussed estimators with STATA. Hence, a basic knowledge of STATA (data handling, running do‐files, etc.) is a prerequisite for the course. If you are not familiar with STATA you might want to check the online introduction from the UCLA Institute for Digital Research and Education https://stats.idre.ucla.edu/stata/. The relevant estimation commands and ado‐files will be explained during the course; some of them require STATA 13 or higher.

Assessment: Students will have to complete an assignment doing (statistical) analyses of a dataset. Results have to be presented in the form of a short summary paper.

More information: https://www.bwl.uni-hamburg.de/forschung/promotion/phd-risk-adjustment-module-description.pdf

University of Hamburg – School of Business: Behavioral & Experimental Economics

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course Instructors: Prof. Dr. Markus Nöth and Prof. Dr. Guido Voigt (both UHH)

Course Value: 2 SWS/4 LP

Date: The course takes place on four Fridays in the summer term 2018: 6.4. / 20.4. / 18.5. / 6.7., 10-12.30h and 13.30-16h

Place: Universität Hamburg

Room: tba

Language of instruction: English

Registration: Please contact stefanie.nonnsen@uni-hamburg.de (first come, first-served)

Course Overview & Contents:
The course discusses the basic steps of performing behavioral research. We start with discussing critical assumptions of game theoretic models. We then show how research hypotheses can be inferred from behavioral models and how these hypotheses may be tested in lab studies. Critical design factors of laboratory experiments and the most commonly applied statistical tests will be presented.
We will further visit the Lab at the UHH while discussing options (e.g. eye-tracking) and limits
(e.g. subject pool, size of the lab) for conducting lab experiments at UHH. The course also provides an overview of commonly applied software tools that are used for behavioral modelling (Maple), software for computerized experiments (z-Tree), and statistical analysis (Stata). Ethical aspects of conducting laboratory experiments underpin the theoretical/fundamental part of this course.
Based on these theoretical foundations, participants are asked to design an experiment. The
presentations will be the basis for passing/failing the course. The topic of the experiment is
open. We may also suggest a topic. If this is the case, please send your research interest along
with the registration.

Prerequisites: Basic background in microeconomics, game theory and statistics.

Assessment: Assessment will be based on active participation. Grading for students
of University of Hamburg will be pass/fail.

More information: https://www.bwl.uni-hamburg.de/forschung/promotion/phd-kurs-noeth-voigt-ss18.pdf

Hamburg Business School: Doctoral study courses in winter semester 2017/18

The following doctoral study courses will be on offer at the Hamburg Business School in winter semester 2017/18:

  • Recent Developments in Causal Inference (Jan 31-Feb 2 2018)
    Martin Spindler (Information)
  • Microeconometrics (Nov 14-16 2017)
    Stefan Hoderlein (Information)
  • Writing skills, intellectual property rights and research integrity (Nov 17 2017)
    Andrea Sanchini (Information)
  • Project management and time/self-management skills (Dec 20 2017)
    Anette Hammerschmidt (Information)

See also https://www.bwl.uni-hamburg.de/en/forschung/promotion.html for further information on the doctoral studies program of the Hamburg Business School.

Universität Hamburg: Zwei wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiter/innen (Strategisches Management)

Fakultät/Fachbereich: Betriebswirtschaft
Seminar/Institut: Lehrstuhl für Strategisches Management (Prof. Dr. Nicola Berg)

Ab dem 01. Juli 2017 (oder nach Vereinbarung) sind zwei Stellen einer/eines wissenschaftlichen Mitarbeiterin/Mitarbeiters gemäß § 28 Abs. 1 HmbHG* zu besetzen.

Die Vergütung erfolgt nach der Entgeltgruppe 13 TV-L. Die wöchentliche Arbeitszeit entspricht 75% der regelmäßigen wöchentlichen Arbeitszeit.**

Die Befristung erfolgt auf der Grundlage von § 2 Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz. Die Befris-tung ist vorgesehen für die Dauer von zunächst drei Jahren.

Die Universität strebt die Erhöhung des Anteils von Frauen am wissenschaftlichen Personal an und fordert deshalb qualifizierte Frauen nachdrücklich auf, sich zu bewerben. Frauen werden im Sinne des Hamburgischen Gleichstellungsgesetzes bei gleichwertiger Qualifikation vorrangig berücksichtigt.

Aufgaben:
Zu den Aufgaben einer wissenschaftlichen Mitarbeiterin/eines wissenschaftlichen Mitarbeiters gehören wissenschaftliche Dienstleistungen vorranging in der Forschung und der Lehre. Es besteht Gelegenheit zur wissenschaftlichen Weiterbildung, insbesondere zur Anfertigung einer Dissertation, hierfür steht mindestens ein Drittel der jeweiligen Arbeitszeit zur Verfügung.

Aufgabengebiet:
Das Aufgabengebiet dieser Stelle umfasst die Mitwirkung an Lehrveranstaltungen im Umfang von 3 Semesterwochenstunden bei 0,75% der regulären Arbeitszeit, die Planung und Durchführung von Forschungsprojekten, die Mitarbeit an Publikationen und die Kooperation mit Partnern aus der Wirtschaft. Geboten werden anspruchsvolle Forschungsarbeiten in einem engagierten Team sowie eine systematische Betreuung Ihres Dissertationsvorhabens.

Einstellungsvoraussetzungen:
Abschluss eines den Aufgaben entsprechenden Hochschulstudiums. Erwartet wird ein Hochschulstudium im Fach Betriebswirtschaftslehre mit einer Vertiefung in den Studienfächern Internationales Management, Strategisches Management oder Personalmanagement. Als Person weisen Sie Teamgeist, Internationalität, Praxiserfahrung und Erfahrungen in theoriegeleiteter-empirischer Forschung auf.

Schwerbehinderte haben Vorrang vor gesetzlich nicht bevorrechtigten Bewerberinnen/Bewerbern bei gleicher Eignung, Befähigung und fachlicher Leistung.

Für nähere Informationen wenden Sie sich bitte an Frau Prof. Dr. Nicola Berg (nicola.berg@uni-hamburg.de) oder schauen Sie im Internet unter http://www.bwl.uni-hamburg.de/de/stman nach.

Bitte senden Sie Ihre Bewerbung mit den üblichen Unterlagen (Bewerbungsschreiben, tabella-rischer Lebenslauf, Hochschulabschluss) bis Montag, 01. Oktober 2017 an:
Prof. Dr. Nicola Berg
Universität Hamburg
Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft
Lehrstuhl für Strategisches Management
Von-Melle-Park 5
D-20146 Hamburg.

* Hamburgisches Hochschulgesetz
** die regelmäßige wöchentliche Arbeitszeit beträgt derzeit 39 Stunden

Weitere Informationen

Experimental Economics

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course instructor: Prof. Dr. Markus Nöth (Universität Hamburg)

Date: block course:

April 7 th, 2017: 8:15am-5:00pm (10*45min)
May 5th, 2017: 8:15am-1:00pm (6*45min)
June 2nd, 2017: 8:15am-5:00pm (10*45min)
June 21st, 2017: 6:00pm-7:30pm (2*45min)

Room: tbd (Moorweidenstraße 18, Von-Melle-Park 5 (ExpLab))

Course Value: 2 SWS or 4 LP

Teaching language: English

Registration: Send an email to markus.noeth@uni-hamburg.de until March 17th, 2017; please indicate if you prefer some specific topics to be covered.

Course Overview:
The main goal of this course is to give an introduction to the design and implementation of both laboratory and field experiments in various fields of Economics and Business Administration. PhD students who have some experience with or who consider to set up an experiment are welcome to participate in this course. First, we will identify different research questions for a laboratory or a field experiment. Second, based on a literature review (for some research fields that are proposed by the participants) an experimental design is developed and a pilot experiment will be set up and run in class. As part of this exercise, students will learn the basic requirements of a human subjects committee.

Topics:

  • Identify a suitable research question for an experiment
  • Ethical and scientific standards: historical and scientific reasons, consent requirements, human subjects committee, special requirements (children, elderly people, inmates, …), data collection and evaluation
  • Individual and group experiments in the laboratory
  • Surveys and internet experiments
  • Field experiments in cooperation with a company

General literature:

  • Kagel, John H., and Alvin E. Roth, 1995, The Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton/Oxford
  • Gerber, Alan S., and Donald P. Green, 2012, Field Experiments, W.W. Norton & Company, London/New York.
  • Kagel, John H., and Alvin E. Roth, 2015, The Handbook of Experimental Economics Volume 2, Princeton University Press, Princeton/Oxford

Assessment:

  • Paper presentation (May 5th)
  • experiment design presentation (extended summary on economic question, relevant literature, hypotheses, design: presentation with max. 10 slides or max. five pages extended abstract)
  • running a pilot experiment is optional

University of Hamburg: Introduction to Research in Closed-Loop Supply Chains

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course instructor: : Prof. Gilvan Souza (Kelley School of Business, Indiana University)

Date: June 16th 2017, 09:00-13:00 h  (block course)

Room: tba

Course Value: 1 LP

Teaching language: English

Registration: Please register via email to stefanie.nonnsen@uni-hamburg.de

Course Overview:
This course will provide an overview of research and tools used in closed-loop supply chain management research in operations management. A closed-loop supply chain is a supply chain with flows of products post-consumer use from consumers to retailers, manufacturers, and/or suppliers. Examples include consumer returns, and post-lease products. Emphasis will be given to strategic decision-making, such as product line extension, choice of product quality, and take-back legislation.

Course Contents:

  • An overview to closed-loop supply chains (CLSCs): types of product returns, and types of disposition decisions.
  • Examples of strategic, tactical and operational decisions in CLSCs
  • Strategic decision 1: Should an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) offer a remanufactured product in its product line?
    • Monopoly pricing for a single product, and for a vertically differentiated product line under linear demand curves and constant marginal costs
    • The fundamental trade-off: Market expansion vs. cannibalization
    • Extension: non-linear demand curves
    • Competition between an OEM and a third-party remanufacturer
  • Strategic decision II: What is the optimal product quality when there is product recovery in the form of remanufacturing and/or recycling?
    • Introduction to classical quality choice models without product recovery (Mussa and Rosen, 1978)
    • Quality choice with product recovery: monopoly (Atasu and Souza 2013)
    • Quality choice with product recovery: competition between an OEM and a third-party remanufacturer (Orsdemir et al. 2014)
  • Strategic decision III: Design of optimal take-back legislation from a policy maker’s perspective, and an OEM’s response to it
    • The concept of welfare and its components: firms’ profits plus consumer surplus minus environmental impact
    • The model by Atasu and Van Wassenhove (2009)
  • Incentives and coordination in CLSCs
    • Reducing consumer returns through retailer effort (Ferguson, Guide, and Souza, 2006)
  • Overview of tactical decision making in CLSCs
    • Production planning for remanufactured products: product acquisition, grading, and disposition decisions
    • Hybrid inventory systems

Prerequisites: Background in Operations and Supply Chain Management is preferred but not absolutely necessary.

Assessment: Participation in discussion

University of Hamburg: HCHE Research Seminar and PhD Course 24 to 25 April 2017

Institution: Hamburg Center for Health Economics (HCHE)

Course instructor: Professor Mike Drummond, Professor of Health Economics and former Director of the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York

Date: 24-25 April 2017

Time:

  • 24 April: arrival of Prof. Mike Drummond, individual meetings (please ask for an appointment: andrea.buekow@uni-hamburg.de)
  • 24 April, 4:30 pm: HCHE Research Seminar Title: Where politics and economics collide: the case of orphan drugs
  • 25 April, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm: PhD Course Title: Methodological and Policy Issues in Economic Evaluation

Place: HCHE, Esplanade 36

  • HCHE Research Seminar: Rooms 4011/13
  • PhD Course: Rooms 4030/31

Credit Points: 1 SWS/2 LP (Universität Hamburg)

Teaching language: English

Registration for the PhD Course:  andrea.buekow@uni-hamburg.de, no later than 14 April 2017

University of Hamburg: Statistical Analysis of Big Data

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course instructor: Prof. Martin Spindler (UHH)

Date: Semester course, Time: T or W, 8-10am

Place: tba

Course value: 2 SWS or 4 LP

Course overview:
The main goal of this course is to give an introduction to statistical methods for the analysis of big data. Recently developed methods are discussed, in particular various methods of machine learning are presented and basic concepts for the analysis of big data are introduced. The course is based on the recent book by Efron and Hastie (2016).

Reference: Efron, B. and T. Hastie. Computer Age Statistical Inference. Cambridge University Press 2016.

Teaching language: English

Student evaluation: paper presentation/presentation of a chapter of the book

Registration: by email to martin.spindler@uni-hamburg.de