Author Archives: Simon Jebsen

Academic English Writing

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Jonathan Mole (Europa-Universität Flensburg)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: Writing an academic text is a complex task. It requires knowledge of a range of accepted writing conventions and the ability to construct sentences that are not only idiomatically and grammatically correct but also suitably connected to one another. An awareness of the requirements and a degree of practice are necessary.

This workshop is primarily for people who are in the process of writing an academic text in English – a proposal, abstract, article, thesis etc. It allows you to obtain individual feedback on a text you submit before the workshop. In the workshop, assistance will be given to enable you to self-correct any issues which have been highlighted (structure, understanding, logic, language etc.). In addition, an overview of the important characteristics of academic English writing will be discussed. If required, exercises will be available to highlight topics such as academic style (formality, impersonal and objective language, passive voice, caution, nominalisation); structure of a sentence, paragraph and document level; reporting verbs and their forms; coherence and cohesion; and citation and reference styles.

A requirement of students: Please supply a maximum of 2 pages of text at least two weeks before the workshop begins. English language skills at CEFR level B2/C1 are required.

Recommended literature and pre-reading: None.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Principles of Data Visualization

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Daniel Schnitzlein (Leibniz University Hannover & Innside Statistics)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: Results of scientific research are often (and increasingly) complex and hard to understand for a non-scientific audience. However, at the same time, the transfer of results from academic research to an outside-academia recipient, for example, politics, private foundations or private firms providing research funding, but also the interested public, gets more and more important. Probably the most important skill in this context is the ability to create good visualization of your main (quantitative data-based) results.

Today, data are everyday companions in almost all scientific and professional fields. The graphical representation of data is both an elementary step in the analysis process and an important component in communicating the results. The course Principles of Data Visualization trains this ability and leads you away from the standard diagrams of common office/statistics packages to clear and concise data representations with the help of many practice-oriented examples. The course consists of 50% lectures and 50% hands-on sessions. The methods trained in this course are applicable to all visualization tasks independent of the applied software package. The exercises in the hands-on sessions can be carried out using your preferred software tool.

Requirement of students: Basic knowledge of empirical (quantitative) social and economic research is beneficial but not strictly necessary.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Jonas Buche (Lower Saxony Ministry of Science and Culture)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: Since publishing the seminal work “The Comparative Method” by Charles Ragin in 1987, set-theoretic methods and especially Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) have become a common research strategy in the social sciences. Set-theoretic methods analyse cases concerning identifying sufficient and necessary conditions and assume set relations to be equifinal, conjunctural and asymmetric. Since so-called fuzzy sets have been introduced to the method, there has been a rising interest in QCA as a welcome alternative to both small-n case studies and large-n statistical analyses. In short, QCA is recommended if ‘if…then’ hypotheses are analysed, if the goal is to derive sufficient and necessary conditions, if a comparison is planned, and if there is a mid-sized number of cases (between 10 and 60+).

The course offers a comprehensive introduction to QCA and is conceptually and technically oriented. It starts off with an overview of the basics of set theory and demarcates QCA as a case-oriented method from both the quantitative and the interpretive-qualitative research paradigms. The single elements are built into the Truth Table Algorithm through the notion of necessary and sufficient conditions and truth tables. However, this algorithm is not free of problems. Therefore, some pitfalls and strategies on how to overcome them are presented. The software tool fsQCA will be introduced and applied to published studies on the third day.

A requirement of students: No prior knowledge is required. We will use the software fsQCA, which can be downloaded at www.fsqca.com.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Questionnaire Design

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Daniel Schnitzlein (Leibniz University Hannover & Innside Statistics)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: The course provides an overview of the theoretical basics and empirical evidence of questionnaire design. The cognitive process of survey responding, challenges of designing effective survey questions, including proper question wording and optimal response formats, and pretest techniques for evaluating survey questions will be discussed. A practical part will accompany the lecture.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Case Study Research

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: PD Dr. Kamil Marcinkiewicz

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: Case study research is frequently applied in the social sciences. It is particularly popular among political scientists, especially those specialising in area studies. The ubiquity of the case study research contrasts with the scarcity of theoretical reflection on its core methodological aspects. Also, the benefits of comparative analyses are often underestimated. In this course, participants will have an opportunity to learn more about what case study research is, its weaknesses and strengths and how we should go about the core question in designing a case study: a selection of cases. The course combines lectures with practical exercises and discussions of students’ projects.

A requirement for students: Please bring your laptop computer.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Gerring, J. (2007). Case Study Research: Principles and Practices (pp. 17-63). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • George, A. L., & Bennett, A. (2005). Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences (pp. 1-34). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Rueschemeyer, D. (2003). Can One or a Few Cases Yield Theoretical Gains? In J. Mahoney and D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences (pp. 305-337) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hall, P.A. (2008). Systematic Process Analysis: When and How to Use it. European Political Science, 7(3), 304-317.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Writing Your Literature Review

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Sylvia Rohlfer (CUNEF University)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: Regardless of discipline and the original research project, the literature review is a key part of a thesis or article. However, writing a literature review is the most daunting part of writing. Doctoral students often comment that the literature seems (and often is) massive. Hence, it might be helpful to be as systematic as possible when completing this task.

This course will give you practical insights and advice on how to write a literature review effectively. This will include tips, tricks and tools to improve your reading and sorting of the references, synthesise the literature, summarise existing debates and provide advice on presenting reviews effectively. We will also consider your writing habits. The sessions will be practical and require active involvement by students working in groups and getting focused feedback on individual projects.

There are no pre-readings for the course, but participants will be required to complete smaller tasks outside the allotted workshop hours. Before the seminar, participants should send an extended abstract of their research project (two pages max. and in English/German/Spanish) to srohlfer@cunef.edu.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Grounded Theory

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Gilberto Rescher (University of Hamburg)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: This workshop aims to offer a comprehensive introduction to Grounded Theory, considering its use in manifold fields and contexts of study and the feasibility of combining it with diverse research techniques (mainly qualitative and ethnographic ones). The workshop is as much oriented to “beginners” interested in learning about the basic epistemological perspective of Grounded Theory and its practice as to participants that already possess deeper knowledge about Grounded Theory or even have employed this methodology in research and wish to discuss specific aspects or questions that arose in research practice. Correspondingly, the workshop will be adjusted to participants’ needs.

Hence, we will discuss basic concepts and procedures like research design, data collection, coding, categorizing, writing memos, theoretical sampling and theoretical saturation. Then exercises based on examples; ideally those attributed by participants, will be employed to clarify these concepts by putting them into practice. Therefore, participants with concrete research projects (be they planned or already put in practice) are invited to share their ideas, design, and material to (further) develop research practices among the group. If you are interested in presenting examples, please contact Gilberto Rescher in English, German, Spanish or Portuguese (gilberto.rescher@uni-hamburg.de). The lecturer will also stress his research experiences to show how he uses Grounded Theory as an important guideline in a broader methodological setting.

In addition to your registration, please answer the following questions (English or German):

  • What is your current status (e.g. PhD student?)
  • What is the focus of your interest in Grounded Theory?
  • What sort of content and feedback do you expect?

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Qualitative Research Methods

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Fabian Hattke (University of Bergen, Norway)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: This course aims to familiarize participants with the basic characteristics of qualitative research. The course introduces methodological and practical aspects of different forms of qualitative research, like case studies, discourse analyses, interviews, observations, and qualitative meta-syntheses. The course covers various issues, including the philosophy of science, research designs, theory building, and sampling strategies. It also discusses practical challenges like developing research questions, using different coding approaches, using technical tools, and using ethical questions.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Adler, P. S., Forbes, L. C., & Willmott, H. (2007). Critical management studies. Academy of Management Annals, 1(1), 119-179.
  • Alvesson, M., & Karreman, D. (2000). Varieties of discourse: On the study of organizations through discourse analysis. Human Relations, 53(9), 1125-1149.
  • Corbin, J., & Strauss, A. (2014). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. Sage publications.
  • Eisenhardt, K. M. (1989). Building theories from case study research. Academy of Management Review, 14(4), 532-550.
  • Flick, U., von Kardoff, E., & Steinke, I. (Eds.). (2004). A companion to qualitative research. Sage.
  • Hoon, C. (2013). Meta-synthesis of qualitative case studies: An approach to theory building. Organizational Research Methods, 16(4), 522-556.
  • Mayring, P. (2004). Qualitative content analysis. A companion to qualitative research. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 1, 159-176.
  • Sandelowski, M., & Barroso, J. (2006). Handbook for synthesizing qualitative research. Springer Publishing.
  • Wodak, R., & Meyer, M. (Eds.). (2015). Methods of critical discourse studies. Sage.
  • Yin, R. K. (2017). Case study research and applications: Design and methods. Sage publications.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Data Analysis with Stata

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Tobias Gramlich (Hesse State Statistical Office)

Date: see Workshop Programme

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents: Stata is a statistical program package widely used (not only) in the social and economic sciences; it is used for data management, statistical graphics, and quantitative data analysis. Statistical concepts will not be part of the course, so participants should have basic knowledge of statistics. The course should enable participants to prepare their data for analysis, perform adequate analysis using a statistical computer program, and document these tasks to keep them reproducible.

For Beginners with no or very little Stata knowledge!

Course topics cover:

  • “What You Type Is What You Get”: Basic Stata Command syntax
  • Getting (and Understanding) Help within Stata: Stata Built-in Help System
  • Basic Data Management: Load and Save Stata Datasets, Generate and Manipulate Variables, Describe and Label Data and Variables, Perform Basic uni- and bivariate Analyses, and Change the Structure of your Data.
  • Basic Stata Graphics: Scatterplot, Histogram, Bar Chart
  • Working with “Do-” and “Log-” Files

A requirement for students: Statistical concepts will not be part of the course, so participants should have some basic knowledge of statistics.

Recommended literature and pre-readings: None.

You must register for the International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

EURAM 2023 & MREV Call for Papers: Sustainability at Work: HRM Practices and Their Impact on Employees and Firm Outcomes

*** Apologies for any cross-postings ***

Call for Papers: Sustainability at Work: HRM Practices and Their Impact on Employees and Firm Outcomes 

Guest Editors:
Konstantina Tzini, CUNEF University Madrid, Spain
Sylvia Rohlfer, CUNEF University Madrid, Spain
Abderrahman Hassi, Al Akhawayn University Ifrane, Morocco
Simon Jebsen, University of Southern Denmark

EURAM 2023 SIG 09 Organisational Behaviour Track 09 & MREV Special Issue

Companies, employees, and scholars alike have taken a growing interest in sustainable HRM (Ehnert et al., 2016; Stahl et al., 2020), especially in the face of current trends in the workplace – like remote working and digitalisation – in the post-COVID-19 era (McKinsey Global Institute, 2021). Since HRM practices affect not only employees but also the human, social, and environmental firm context (Rothenberg et al., 2017), developing more sustainable HRM systems can enhance social sustainability (Ehnert, 2009; Pfeffer, 2010) and help organisations reach their corporate sustainability goals (Taylor et al., 2012).

To achieve these organisational goals, however, the response of employees, work teams, and managers to sustainable HRM practices is crucial, as they hold a primary role in the success of sustainable HRM (Paulet et al., 2021). The common view is that sustainable HRM will positively affect employees (Aust et al., 2020), therefore assuming favourable responses at the individual level and consequently positive outcomes at the organisational level.

The growing embracement of sustainable HRM in today’s changing workplace provides excellent research opportunities to study its multifaceted, under-explored outcomes and to contribute to “Transforming Business for Good”. This track explores the impact of sustainable HRM on employee attitudes and behaviours, the interplay of sustainable HRM with other corporate initiatives and changing work practices, and its ultimate link to organisational-level outcomes.

Possible themes include but are not limited to:

  1. The impact of different sustainable HRM practices on shaping employee attitudes and behaviours at the individual and group level. Empirical evidence of both positive (e.g., employee well-being, engagement) and adverse outcomes for employees (e.g., burden requirements, unethical behaviours) are welcome.
  2. Organisational value creation and outcomes of using sustainable HRM (e.g., sustainable employment, innovation, performance)
  3. Possible synergies or redundancies stemming from the combination of sustainable HRM and other corporate sustainability initiatives and their effect on individual and organisational level outcomes
  4. The interplay between sustainable HRM and current trends in the workplace, such as remote work and digitalisation, and their effect on individual employee attitudes, behaviour, and performance.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Konstantina Tzini (konstantina.tzini@cunef.edu), Sylvia Rohlfer, Abderrahman Hassi, Simon Jebsen

This call for papers is related to a European Academy of Management (EURAM) track. We encourage interested colleagues to submit and present their research at the conference. However, it can contribute to the special issue without joining the conference.

European Academy of Management (EURAM)

The European Academy of Management (EURAM) is a learned society founded in 2001. It aims at advancing the academic discipline of management in Europe. With members from 49 countries in Europe and beyond, EURAM has a high degree of diversity and provides its members with opportunities to enrich debates over various research management themes and traditions. EURAM 2023 is from 14 to 16 June 2023 at Trinity Business School in Dublin, Ireland.

The deadline for paper submission is 10 January 2023 (2 pm Belgium time). Contributors are notified of acceptance in mid-March. Further information about the deadlines and important other dates can be found on the EURAM homepage. The author’s guidelines and information about the submission procedure can also be found on the EURAM homepage.

Special Issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies

management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary European journal publishing both qualitative and quantitative work, as well as purely theoretical papers that advance the study of management, organisation, and industrial relations. The journal publishes articles contributing to theory from several disciplines, including business and public administration, organisational behaviour, economics, sociology, and psychology. Reviews of books relevant to management and organisation studies are a regular feature.

All contributors to the EURAM track are invited to submit their papers for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue must be submitted by 30 September 2023. All contributions will be subject to double-blind reviews. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due 31 March 2024. The publication is scheduled for issue 3/2024. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system using ‘SI Sustainability at Work’ as the article section.

The manuscript length should not exceed 9,000 words (excluding references), and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s homepage.

References

Aust, I., Matthews, B., & Muller-Camen, M. (2020). Common Good HRM: A paradigm shift in Sustainable HRM? Human Resource Management Review, 30(3), 100705.

Pfeffer, J. (2010). Building sustainable organisations: the human factor. Academy of Management Perspectives, 24(1), 34-45.

Stahl, G. K., Brewster, C. J., Collings, D. G., & Hajro, A. (2020). Enhancing the role of human resource management in corporate sustainability and social responsibility: A multi-stakeholder, multidimensional approach to HRM. Human Resource Management Review, 30(3), 100708.

Taylor, S., Osland, J., Egri, C.P. (2012). Introduction to HRM’s role in sustainability: Systems, strategies and practices. Human Resource Management, 51(6), 789-798.