Author Archives: sfietze

Qualitative Interviewing

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Nicolas Legewie (German Institute for Economic Research – DIW Berlin)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (14.30-18.00 h)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

In this course, participants will learn the basics of qualitative interviewing. We will work with a standard guided interviewing technique. In three sessions we will cover issues of research design (research questions and case selection), design interview guidelines, conducting interviews, and analysing qualitative interview data. The structure of the course follows a workshop format, with participants practising design, interviewing, and analytic skills in individual and group exercises.

Participants who attend this workshop will have familiarised themselves with relevant methodological and practical issues of qualitative interviewing and gathered first experiences designing, conducting, and analysing qualitative interviews.

Requirement of students: Basic knowledge on methods of empirical social research is required. No previous knowledge of qualitative methods is necessary.

Recommended literature and pre-readings: tba.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Visual Data Analysis

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Jun.-Prof. Dr. Anne Nassauer (Free-University Berlin)

Date: Thursday, 14/09/17 (09.30 – 18.00 h)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

Since the early 2000s, the proliferation of cameras, whether in mobile phones or CCTV, body cameras, or drones, has led to a tremendous increase in visual recordings of human behaviour. More and more of such data is uploaded online, for instance on sharing platforms such as YouTube or LiveLeaks. This vast pool of data enables new approaches analysing a variety of social phenomena. The application is both qualitative and quantitative and ranges widely; from sociology to psychology; criminology to education and beyond.

The goal of this workshop is to introduce the opportunities that these technological advancements provide and enable participants to make use of these exponentially growing, easily accessible data pools to studying social phenomena.

The first part of this workshop (2 hrs) will provide an overview of approaches analysing visual data. We will examine qualitative approaches of studying visuals and their context (visual studies), as well as a variety of novel approaches to visual data, that focus on quantitative and qualitative analysis of social phenomena and human behaviour caught on tape (visual data analysis).

A second part (2 hrs) will discuss the analytic potential of novel visual data types. We will discuss opportunities and challenges that arise when wanting to study recordings of phenomena or behaviour “as it happened.” We will discuss: How can participants use the increasing amount of behaviour – captured by cell phones, drones, or police body cameras – as a reliable and valid data source in their PhD project? What can be studied using these data and which analytic procedures are useful to study them?

A third part of the workshop (2 hrs) will discuss the participants’ PhD projects in light of these opportunities. We will take a hands-on approach and go through the process of visual data collection and visual data analysis step by step by using examples. Students can either bring recordings that they want to use as an (additional) data source for their PhD, or we will examine other practical examples.

Requirement of students: None.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Harper, Douglas. 1988. “Visual Sociology: Expanding Sociological Vision.” The American Sociologist 19(1):54–70.
  • Nassauer, Anne and Nicolas Legewie. Under Review. “Visual Data Analysis: Towards a Methodological Framework for a Novel Trend in Studying Behavior.”

Optional readings:

  • Klusemann, Stefan. 2009. “Atrocities and Confrontational Tension.” Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 3(42):1–10.
  • Levine, Mark, Paul J. Taylor, and Rachel Best. 2011. “Third Parties, Violence, and Conflict Resolution: The Role of Group Size and Collective Action in the Micro-regulation of Violence.” Psychological Science 22(3):406–12.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Quantile Regression

Institution: see Organisers & Acknowledgements

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: PD Dr. Elke Holst (DIW Berlin & University of Flensburg), Andrea Schäfer, SOCIUM/Universität Bremen)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (09.00 – 12.30 h)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

Quantile regression is a statistical analysis able to detect more effects than classical procedures, it does not restrict attention to the conditional mean and therefore it permits to approximate the whole distribution of a response variable. This course will introduce the basics of quantile regression methods and briefly discuss some recent developments, highlighting among others the differences between conditional and unconditional regression frameworks.

The course will further illustrate their application – discussing practical aspects of computation and inference – with the aim of providing practical guidance on the use of the methods in realistic applications. The application refers to the German wage structure using the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Thus, a substantial part of the course will cover an overview of the SOEP data structure and the research designs facilitated by longitudinal household studies that go beyond conventional surveys (household analysis, intergenerational analysis, life course research, etc.).

By the end of the course participants will:

  • Understand the use of quantile regression with continuous outcomes;
  • Become familiar with some of the background theory;
  • Become aware of some recent developments in quantile regression;
  • Be familiar with structure and content of SOEP survey data;
  • Apply the methods to real data;
  • Be trained in the use of statistical software for implementing the methods.

The course will use the STATA software. Prior familiarity with STATA would be an advantage although the course will cover some STATA basics. Familiarity with linear regression and basic distribution functions is assumed.

Requirement of students: intermediate statistical knowledge, basic Stata skills

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Davino, C.; Furno, M. and Vistocco, D. (2014). Quantile Regression: Theory and Applications. John Wiley & Sons.
  • Haisken-DeNew, J.P. and Frick, J.R. (Eds.) (2005). DTC Desktop Companion to the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Version 8.0 – Dec 2005, Updated to Wave 21 (U). This documentation is intended to give novice users a “jump start” in understanding the SOEP, its structure, depth, and research potential.
  • Hao, L. and Naiman, D.Q. (2007). Quantile Regression. Quantitative Applications in the Social Sciences, No. 149.
  • Koenker R. (2005). Quantile Regression. Cambridge University Press.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Data Analysis with R

Institution: see Organisers & Acknowledgements

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Marco Lehmann (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (14.30 – 18.00 h)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The course introduces the programming language R used for statistical analyses. The beginning of each lecture comes with a demonstration of programming and statistical functions that will be elaborated in the course of study. The students will then practice with many statistical examples. In addition to statistical functions, the course will introduce the definition of R as a programming language and its syntax rules. Students will further learn to use R’s scripting capabilities. Successful participation requires basic knowledge in descriptive and inferential statistics. The students are encouraged to bring their own laptops with the free software R (www.r-project.org/) and RStudio (www.rstudio.com/) installed.

Requirement of students: Basic knowledge in descriptive and inferential statistics is recommended.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Matloff, N. (2011). The Art of R Programming: A Tour of Statistical Software Design. No Starch Press.
  • Wollschläger, Daniel (2012). Grundlagen der Datenauswertung mit R (2. Aufl.). Berlin: Springer.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Academic English Writing

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Jonathan Mole (Europa-Universität Flensburg)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (14.30 – 18.00 h)

Max. number of participants: 15

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

Writing an academic text can be a daunting and complex task requiring the knowledge of a range of accepted writing conventions as well as the ability to construct sentences that are idiomatically and grammatically correct. This workshop is primarily aimed at people who are in the process of writing an academic text – a thesis, proposal, article etc. It provides the opportunity to obtain individual feedback on a text which you submit prior to the workshop. During the workshop, assistance will be given to enable you to self-correct any issues that have been highlighted (structure, understanding, logic, language etc.). In addition, or for those participants who are not in the writing process, exercises will be available dealing with a range of topics including: academic style (formality, impersonal and objective language, passive voice, caution, nominalisation); structure at sentence, paragraph and document level; reporting verbs and their forms; coherence and cohesion. Answers will be provided for all exercises as well as a range of potentially useful information, links, book recommendations etc.

Requirement of students: For those wishing to improve an existing academic text, please supply a maximum of 3 pages at least two weeks before the workshop begins. English language skills at CEFR level B2/C1 are required.

Recommended literature and pre-readings: None.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Analysing Panel and Spatial Data

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Timo Friedel Mitze (University of Southern Denmark/Department of Business and Economics)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (14.30 – 18.00 h)

Max. number of participants: 30

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The course is basically divided into two parts: Part 1) Analysing panel data. Part 2) Spatial Data Analysis

Part 1): Analysis of Panel Data:

This part of the course is an introduction to the panel data analysis and it provides some insights into why we use panel data. What kinds of models are available for panel data and how do we estimate such models. It also covers some extensions to the basic panel data models and finally there will be a session where you will learn how to estimate panel data using STATA.

Part 2): Spatial Data Analysis

In research fields such as regional science, quantitative sociology and business analysis as well as real estate, labour and health economics (to name just a few), researchers are increasingly aware of the fact that “space matters”. Thus, the goal of this workshop module is to equip participants with the basic knowledge about methods and tools currently available in “spatial statistics” and “spatial econometrics”. Besides presenting the general logic and theoretical foundations of these modelling approaches for variables with an explicit geographical context, a strong focus lies on illustrating the potential for applied work with these tools in the software package STATA. The module is structured as follows: After a brief introduction to the historical evolution of spatial data analysis, different research settings in economics and related research fields are outlined, which may call for the explicit use of spatial estimation techniques, for instance, in order to identify the importance of space-time autocorrelations and neighboring effects (spatial spillovers). Following this introduction, the concept of the spatial weighting matrix is introduced and statistical approaches to measure and visualise the degree of spatial dependence for a variable under study are presented. Moving from univariate to multivariate modelling techniques, the course then derives estimation techniques used in the field of spatial econometrics and links this theoretical knowledge with hands-on applications for different spatial datasets. Finally, to serve as an outlook on future research possibilities, state-of-the-art concepts such as spatial panel data models and spatial limited dependent variable models will be presented. Datasets and STATA ado-files will be provided ahead of the course and should be installed on the participants’ computers.

Requirement of students: Basic knowledge of Econometrics. OLS, GLS.  Please bring your laptop computers with STATA installed on it.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Relevant Chapters in Cameron, A.C. und Trivedi, P.K. (2005). Microeconometrics: Methods and Applications. Cambridge University Press, Chapter V

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Data Analysis with Stata

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Tobias Gramlich

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (09.00-12.30 h)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

Stata is a statistical program package widely used (not only) in the social and economic sciences; it is used for data management, statistical graphics and analysis of quantitative data. Statistical concepts will not be part of the course, so participants should have some very basic knowledge of statistics. The course should enable participants to prepare their data for analysis, perform adequate analysis using a statistical computer program and document these tasks to keep them reproducible.

For Beginners with no or very little Stata knowledge!

Course topics cover:

  • “What You Type is What You Get”: Basic stata Command syntax
  • Getting (and Understanding) Help within stata: stata Bulit-in Help System
  • Basic Data Management: Load and Save stata Datasets, Generate and Manipulate Variables, Describe and Label Data and Variables, Perform Basic uni- and bivariate Analyses, Change the Structure of your Data
  • Basic stata Graphics: Scatterplot, Histogram, Bar Chart
  • Working with “Do-” and “Log-” Files

Requirement of students: Statistical concepts will not be part of the course, so participants should have some very basic knowledge of statistics.

Recommended literature and pre-readings: tba.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Jonas Buche (Leibniz Universität Hannover)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 from 14.30 – 18.00 h

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

Since the publication of the seminal work “The Comparative Method” by Charles Ragin in 1987, set-theoretic methods and especially Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) have become a common research strategy in the social sciences. Set-theoretic methods analyse cases with regard to the identification of sufficient and necessary conditions and assume set relations to be equifinal, conjunctural and asymmetric. Not least since so-called fuzzy sets have been introduced to the method, there has been a rising interest in QCA as a welcome alternative to both small-n case studies and large-n statistical analyses. In short, QCA is recommended if ‘if…then’ hypotheses are analysed; if the goal is to derive sufficient and necessary conditions; if a comparison is planned; and if there is a mid-sized number of cases (between 10 and 60+).

The course offers a comprehensive introduction to QCA and is both conceptually and technically oriented. It starts off with an overview of the basics of set theory and demarcates QCA as a case-oriented method from both the quantitative and the interpretive-qualitative research paradigm. Through the notion of necessary and sufficient conditions and of truth tables, the single elements are built into the Truth Table Algorithm. However, this algorithm is not free of problems. Therefore, some pitfalls and strategies how to overcome them are presented. At the third day, the software tool fsQCA will be introduced and applied to published studies.

Requirement of students: No prior knowledge is required. We will use the software fsQCA2.5 which can be downloaded at www.fsqca.com.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Cebotari, Victor, and Maarten P. Vink (2013). “A Configurational Analysis of Ethnic Protest in Europe.” In International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Vol. 54(4), 298-324.
  • Emmenegger, Patrick. (2011). “Job Security Regulations in Western Democracies. A Fuzzy Set Analysis.” In European Journal of Political Research, Vol. 50(3), 336-64.
  • Freitag, Markus, and Raphaela Schlicht (2009). “Educational Federalism in Germany. Foundations of Social Inequality in Education.” In Governance, Vol. 22(1), 47-72.
  • Schneider, Carsten Q./Wagemann, Claudius, 2012. Set-Theoretic Methods for the Social Sciences. A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ragin, Charles C., 2008. Redesigning Social Inquiry. Fuzzy Sets and Beyond. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Goertz, Gary/Mahoney, James, 2012. A Tale of Two Cultures: Quantitative and Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Developing Theoretical Contributions

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Jenny Gibb (The University of Waikato, New Zealand)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (09:00 – 12:30)

Max. number of participants: 15

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

All research is based on theory, but not all theory is based on research. If this claim is true, it is essential for every scholar to understand what theory is, what theory is not, which types of theory there are, how to skillfully apply, extend, build on and connect extant theories and even, how to develop a new theory. In this course, we will examine why this is the case and work to systematically build understanding on how to develop theory and conceptual contributions. In working on theory and conceptual paper development we intend to deepen participants’ appreciation of theory building and to assist them to craft potentially valuable and effective research papers. The course has a practical orientation in that it is application centred. It is not a philosophy of science course.

Requirement of students: None.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Bettis, R. A., Gambardella, A., Helfat, C., & Mitchell, W. 2014. Theory in strategic management. Strategic Management Journal, 35(10): 1411-1413.
  • Corley, K. G. & Gioia, D. A. 2011. Building Theory about Theory Building: What Constitutes a Theoretical Contribution? Academy of Management Review, 36(1): 12-32.
  • Whetten, D. A. 1989. What Constitutes A Theoretical Contribution? Academy of Management Review, 14(4): 490-495.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Qualitative Network Analysis

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Tom Töpfer (University of Bremen)

Date: Thursday, 14/09/17 (09.30 – 18.00)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The growing field of Social Network Analysis (SNA) is dominated by mathematical reasoning. In recent years, however, shortcomings in the adequate interpretation of social meaning and actor-focused questions have led to more qualitative approaches that are often combined with quantitative techniques in mixed-methods designs. This workshop gives an overview of qualitative approaches and methods used in studying social networks and discusses their advantages and disadvantages.

Combining foundations of qualitative research and network analysis, participants will get an insight into fundamental theoretical and methodological concepts. We will outline basic principles used in qualitative network research and illustrate objectives and questions that are applicable with a qualitative perspective. The workshop introduces techniques and methods for qualitative data collection and analysis. In addition, we will illustrate practical implications by using empirical studies from a variety of research fields.

The format of the workshop relies on presentations of the basic concepts, concrete examples from research practice, hands-on strategies and open discussion slots. The workshop also provides the possibility to present own research projects of the participants dealing with qualitative network analysis. Therefore, participants are encouraged to hand in qualitative network material from own empirical projects in advance, so that their work can be discussed in the workshop.

Requirement of students: None.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Hollstein, Betina (2011): Qualitative Approaches. In: Scott, J. & Carrington, P. J. (Eds.). The SAGE Handbook of Social Network Analysis. London/New Delhi: SAGE Publications (pp. 404–417).

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.