Reminder – Call for Papers: Demands in the modern workplace

Special Issue of Management Revue
Demands in the modern workplace

Guest Editors:
Sascha Ruhle, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
Johannes Siegrist, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
Stefan Süß, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
Eva-Ellen Weiß, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany

The flexibility of work organization and employment, the growing need for training and development, digitalization of work, the increasing blurring boundaries between work and private life – the list of developments that have shaped the modern working world in recent years is long. Those developments will continue to affect employees as well as organizations and economies. Especially for employees, several of these developments are challenges rather than improvements. Various approaches have increased our understanding of these and similar challenges, including the job demand-control model (Karasek, 1979), leader-member exchange (Graen & Uhl-Bien, 1995; Hesselgreaves & Scholarios, 2014), the effort–reward imbalance model (Siegrist, 2002) and the concept of work-family conflict (Barnett, 1998).

There are numerous indications that demands in the modern work place lead to elevated stress experiences (Sparks et al., 2001; Sverke et al., 2002; Stansfeld & Candy, 2006) and related health consequences (e.g. Schnall et al., 2009; Siegrist & Wahrendorf, 2016). Sources of stress may, for example, be rooted in role overload or even role underload depending on the type of demands (Shultz et al., 2010). Further, research shows that changing working conditions can provoke conflicts between work and private life (e.g., Byron, 2005). In the long run, impairments of job satisfaction and health can result as well in reduced work engagement and elevated turnover intentions (e.g., Kinnunen, 2008; Li et al., 2015). Thus, organizations increasingly aim at improving working conditions in order to keep their employees healthy and productive.

Divers options exist for organizations to tackle these challenges. For example, both supervisor and coworker support have been shown to reduce the negative consequences of demands (Luchman & González-Morales, 2015), and the same holds true for a transformational leadership style (Weiß & Süß, 2016), while an increase in time flexibility might even further strain the individual (e.g., Biron & van Veldhoven, 2016). Another way to deal with workplace demands might be the development of personal resources, which in turn can decrease burnout (Huang et al., 2015) or the adequate design of employees’ task fields (Shultz et al., 2010).

Yet, to answer challenges resulting from demands in the modern workplace, research might benefit from considering not only results from a single discipline, but a combined perspective. Multiple disciplines, like business administration, psychology, sociology, and occupational medicine contribute to, e.g., research on stress and resulting strain (e.g., Ganster & Rosen, 2013). A joint approach might further enhance our understanding of the prevention, occurrence, and the consequences of work demands as multiple perspectives on the area of research are being combined.

Therefore, prospective papers may address, but are not restricted to, the following questions:

  • Which individual and organizational consequences result from the various developments that characterize the modern working world? And how might organizations manage the different technological and economic changes in order to reduce negative consequences for employees?
  • Under what circumstances do particularly problematic work demands arise? What are the differences between various forms of employment and their influences on work demands?
  • How can organizations manage the various demands in the workplace and which approaches are the most promising ones? What possible help can leadership or co-worker support provide to face increasing work demands?
  • What are the socio-structural and economic antecedents of and consequences caused by work demands? Are there burdens which are unequally distributed among different social or occupational classes that account for differences in the exposure to changing demands?

Potential authors
Authors are encouraged to submit research manuscripts that are likely to make a significant contribution to the literature on demands in the modern workplace. The focus of the Special Issue is empirical – qualitative or quantitative – evidence, and we welcome contributions from business administration, industrial and organizational psychology, work sociology, and occupational medicine as well as other disciplines dealing with the topic of the Special Issue.

Deadline
Full papers for this special edition of “management revue” must be with the editors by 31 January 2017. All submissions will be subject to a double-blind review process. Papers invited for a “revise and resubmit” are due on 31 May 2017. Final decision will be made by September 2017. The special edition will be published in 2017 or 2018. Please submit your papers via email to Sascha Ruhle and Stefan Süß, using “management revue” as a subject.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the website http://www.management-revue.org/authors_guidelines.php and submit the papers electronically by sending a “blind” copy of your manuscript (delete all author identification from this primary document), and in a second document information that would typically appear on the document’s title page (title, author names, complete postal addresses, titles, affiliations, contact information including email, and phone).

We look forward to receiving your contribution!
Sascha Ruhle, Johannes Siegrist, Stefan Süß & Eva-Ellen Weiß

Introduction to Regression Analysis

Institution: Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft, Universität Hamburg

Course Instructor: Dr. Alexa Burmester (Universität Hamburg)

Dates, location: October 10. and 11. 2016; 09:15 – 13:45 h (block course), R. 4030/4031

Course Value: 1 SWS or 2 LP

Course Overview:
This course will give an introduction to regression analysis with Stata.
Course Contents: This course will focus on basic regression analysis. Topics include (1) Data preparation, (2) Summary statistics, (3) Model free evidence, (4) Regression analysis, (5) Check of model assumptions, (6) Nonlinear models & interaction effects, and (7) Panel data.
Individual (or two-person team, with permission) research assignments will be re-quired. Please schedule some time at Monday afternoon for the assignment. Own re-search questions and data are very welcome to be discussed in the course.

Software: Please bring a laptop with Stata 13 or newer. If applicable, you can bring your own data set of your research project.

Prerequisites:
Please also study the following text:
Backhaus, K., B. Erichson, W. Plinke und R. Weiber (2016): Multivariate Analysemethoden, 14. Auflage, Heidelberg (Kapitel 1: Regressionsanalyse)

Assessment: Assessment will be based on active participation and performance on assignments. Grading for students of University of Hamburg will be pass/fail.

Registration: Please e-mail Alexa Burmester: Alexa.Burmester@uni-hamburg.de until 06. October 2016. (Please remember that places will be allocated in order of received registrations.)

SYLLABUS
Day 1:

  • Data preparation
  • Summary statistics
  • Model free evidence
  • Regression analysis
  • Check of model assumptions

Day 2:

  • Presentation of assignment
  • Nonlinear models & interaction effects
  • Panel data
  • Summary

GIGA Hamburg: Introduction to Zotero (22.11.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Dr. Birte Pfeiffer

Schedule: 22.11.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
Zotero is a free, open-source tool that helps you collect, organize, cite and share your research sources. This course will introduce the basics of Zotero such as: installation, adding sources to your library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Mi-crosoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents. Participants are encouraged to bring their personal computers so that they may download and interact with the program.

About the lecturer
Dr Birte Pfeiffer is Research Data Manager at the GIGA Information Centre.

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: Write like a pro. How to get started, organized, finished – and succeed with your texts (20.10. and 24.11.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Dr. Natalie Struve

Schedule: 20.10. and 24.11.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
Being an academic means being a professional writer: for it is through writing that you make an impact and pursue your career. Alas, the writing part of academic work doesn’t seem inviting or even fun to most people. Yet it can be made a lot easier! Furthermore, writing is a useful tool in managing your thesis as well as other complex projects. Learn about helpful techniques and work on your own texts in this two-day workshop.

The workshop is split into two parts. It comes with an accompanying wiki to supply you with further information and impulses as well as a place to discuss topics. Please note that you will be asked to take part in all of that, and accomplish 3-4 small tasks before and in between workshop days.

About the trainer
Dr Natalie Struve has taught at both German and British universities. Now she coaches academic writers of all fields and levels, and provides workshops for universities and research organizations

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: CAS & Global Studies III: Promises and Potential Problems of Comparative Analysis (14.12.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Dr. André Bank

Schedule: 14.12.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
Building on the introductory courses on Comparative Area Studies, this course will focus on CAS’ concrete implementation in empirical, comparative studies. After a brief overview on current CAS-related research in the study of Middle East politics, the course will examine and discuss the promises and potential problems of this strategy in view of two important examples, both stemming from the comparative politics of the Arab Uprisings.

About the lecturer
Dr André Bank is senior research fellow at the GIGA Institute of Middle East Studies.

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: CAS & Global Studies II: Comparing Across World Regions: Assets and Pitfalls (15.11.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Dr. Christian von Soest

Schedule: 15.11.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
A key aim of Comparative Area Studies is to stimulate – where applicable – systematic comparison across world regions. However, scholars have paid insufficient attention to bridge the research divide between different world regions, these traditionally conceived areas have been studied in largely distinct academic discourses. This course deals with the practical as well as conceptual assets and pitfalls of cross-regional comparison. For this, we will draw on two articles that focus on case selection techniques and give specific examples of cross-area comparisons.

About the lecturer
Dr. Christian von Soest is lead research fellow of GIGA’s research programme 4 on Peace and Security.

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: Quantitative Approaches to Data Collection and Analysis (08.-09.11.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Vera Troeger

Schedule: 08.-09.11.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
This course will cover various questions and specification issues in multivariate quantitative data analysis and is designed for students with only basic knowledge of applied data analysis. The course deals with different problems arising in applied data analysis when multiple violations of the basic regression assumptions occur. We will start by discussing the basic Gauss-Markov assumptions of OLS regression analysis, their violations and suitable solutions to such misspecifications, especially when they occur in conjunction. Thus, participants will learn how to deal with different types of heteroskedasticity, spatial correlation, serial correlation and dynamics as well as various kinds of heterogeneity. This discussion will include working with divers data such as crosssectional, time-series, panel and pooled data. The course combines a more theoretical introduction into different topics with practical analysis of diverse data sets using STATA. Students are encouraged to bring their own data sets and present their research projects and empirical analysis during the course.

About the lecturer
Prof Dr Vera Troeger is Professor of Quantitative Political Economy and PPE Co-Director at the University of Warwick.

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: Qualitative Approaches to Data Collection and Analysis (03.-04.11.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Dr. Lea Sgier

Schedule: 03.-04.11.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
This seminar aims to introduce doctoral students to key elements of qualitative research: 1) its main traditions and paradigms, in particular ‘mainstream’ qualitative research aiming for theory-testing and by and large grounded in the assumptions of positivism, and interpretive research aiming for an understanding of deeper structures of meaning that shape the social and political world; 2) the specificities, uses and limitations of qualitative research and their implications for the research process and research design; 3) the main approaches to data collection and analysis, in particular documentary/archival research, qualitative interviewing, focus groups and ethnographic research; content-based types of analysis and interpretive types of analysis such as discourse and narrative analysis. The aim of this workshop is twofold: students who do (or consider doing) qualitative research will find some “food for thought” as to how what they do or consider doing fits into the wider universe of research methodology, and what key difficulties they should be prepared to deal with; students who do not work with qualitative methods should acquire a basic “literacy” in qualitative research so as to be able to understand what other researchers do and think about it constructively.

About the lecturer
Dr. Lea Sgier is an assistant professor at the Political Science Department of Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, and an associate researcher and lecturer at the University of Geneva. She is also an instructor at various social science methodology summer schools and doctoral programmes in and outside Europe.

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: Research Designs and Research Questions (27.-28.10.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Heike Klüver

Schedule: 27.-28.10.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
This course will introduce PhD students to the fundamentals of crafting a research design in the Social Sciences. A well-thought and carefully designed research plan is the key to a good disser-tation. The research design specifies how you are going to carry out your research project and, particularly, how to use empirical evidence to answer your research question. This course is designed to introduce students to the core issues involved in developing a sound research design.

The course will cover basic issues of crafting a research design such as finding a research question, conceptualization and measurement and we will talk about different research design types. Students will also have the possibility to present their own research designs in the light of the different design strategies discussed in the seminar and are expected to actively participate in the seminar meetings.

About the trainer
Prof Dr Heike Klüver is Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Hamburg. She previously worked as Professor of Empirical Political Science at the University of Bamberg.

Further information

GIGA Hamburg: CAS & Global Studies I: Comparative Area Studies: What they are and where they come from (13.10.2016)

Institution: German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA)

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Patrick Köllner

Schedule: 13.10.2016

Place: GIGA, Neuer Jungfernstieg 21, 20534 Hamburg, Germany

Registration: Participants need to register online by filling in the registration form that is available on the website of the respective event (see below).

Course description:
This first introductory seminar on Comparative Area Studies (CAS) explains where CAS come from and what they set out to do. We will start with a brief discussion of what area studies are and what kind of critiques they have faced, then spell out the rationale of CAS, and finally trace their development at the GIGA and beyond. A particular focus will be put on the types (or levels) of comparison employed in CAS-related scholarship. Seminar participants will be provided with core texts on CAS and with additional literature on issues covered in the seminar.

About the lecturer
Prof Dr Patrick Köllner is director of the GIGA Institute of Asian Studies and acting lead research fellow of GIGA’s research programme 4 on Power and Ideas.

Further information