Category Archives: Call for Papers

MREV – Call for Papers: Employee Voice and the Digitalization of Work

Guest Editors:

Simon Fietze, University of Southern Denmark
Sylvia Rohlfer, Colegio Universitario de Estudios Financieros (CUNEF), Spain
Wenzel Matiaske, Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany

Special Issue

Over the past four decades, scholars from employment relations, human resource management, organisational behaviour and labour economics have published a vast body of literature concerning employee voice (Wilkinson & Fay, 2011). Employee voice is thereby understood as the opportunity to participate in organisational decision-making and to have a say to influence the own work and the interests of managers and owners (Barry &Wilkinson, 2016) or – in the case of employee silence – to withhold these views and concerns (Morrison & Milliken, 2003). Employee voice and silence have been linked to organisational performance and the development of competitive advantage (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016) and are a key ingredient for the positive relationship between strategic human resource management and organisational performance (Wood & Wall, 2007) which also implies a link between employee voice and innovation. Employees with the opportunity to communicate individual ideas to management and to participate in decision-making give them the possibility to express ‘creative ideas and new perspectives, increasing the likelihood of innovation’ (Grant, 2013, p. 1703; Zhou & George, 2001).

Recently, scholars are paying more attention to current topics and relate them to employee voice. One stream of research is addressing the advancing technologies and consider the digital revolution and its impact on employee voice. There is no doubt that digital technology is fundamentality changing the way we do business (Mennie, 2015) and in consequence forms, tools and channels ‘voice’. The few studies on employee voice and digitalisation are mainly dealing with social media at work and its opportunities for management to get in dialogue with employees. Holland, Cooper, and Hecker (2019), for instance, discuss conceptual issues and opportunities social media provides in the development of employee voice. In a similar vein, Barnes, Balnave, Thornthwaite, and Manning (2019) show how a union’s use of social media might facilitate greater member participation and engagement. However, more empirical evidence and conceptual considerations are needed to better understand and explain digitalisation and employee voice (or: ‘e-voice’).

Therefore, the aim of the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is to focus on digitalisation at work and its challenges and opportunities for employee engagement, voice and silence in cross-disciplinary discussions. We welcome empirical studies as well as theoretical papers. Some context to discuss are listed below:

  • To what extent do technologies impact employee voice and silence?
  • To what extent do employees make use of technology to ‘raise their voice’?
  • What role do trade unions play when it comes to electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice?
  • What is the impact of electronic (e.g., social media) voice on traditional mechanisms of employee voice?
  • What is the effectiveness of electronic (e.g., social media) voice? How does it compare to the outcomes of traditional mechanisms?
  • Why do electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice systems fail?
  • What is the ‘dark side’ of electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice/silence?

These are just some ideas and not an exhaustive list.

Deadline
Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by 31 October 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due 31 March 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 1/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using ‘SI Employee Voice’ as article section.

Manuscript length should not exceed 10,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Simon Fietze
Sylvia Rohlfer
Wenzel Matiaske

Call for Dissertations: promotion – der Dissertationswettbewerb des Verlags Barbara Burdich

Der Verlag Barbara Budrich schreibt auch in diesem Jahr wieder den Dissertationspreis ‚promotion‘ aus, bei dem eine Promovendin oder ein Promovend eine kostenlose Veröffentlichung seiner/ihrer Dissertationsschrift gewinnen kann.

Reichen Sie Ihre eigene Dissertation bis spätestens 31.08.2020 (Poststempel) ein, lassen Sie diese von einer Fachjury bewerten und gewinnen Sie mit etwas Glück die kostenlose Veröffentlichung Ihrer Dissertation in der Reihe promotion im Verlag Barbara Budrich!

Teilnehmen können alle, die eine Dissertation in einem der fünf Fachbereiche des Verlages (Erziehungswissenschaft, Geschlechterforschung, Politik, Soziale Arbeit, Soziologie) angefertigt, im Laufe von 12 Monaten vor dem 31. August abgeschlossen und diese noch nicht (auch nicht digital) veröffentlicht haben. Die eingereichten Dissertationen müssen zudem mit mindestens ‚magna cum laude‘ bewertet worden sein.

Bei Interesse finden Sie alle wichtigen Informationen zur Teilnahme unter http://www.budrich-academic.de/de/studieren/promotion/. Bei Fragen wenden Sie sich gerne an Franziska Deller, promotion@budrich.de.

REMINDER: MREV – Call for Papers: New Work Arrangements – A review of concepts and theories

Guest Editors:
Ralph Kattenbach, International School of Management, Hamburg
Johannes Moskaliuk, International School of Management, Stuttgart
Barbara Kump, WU Wien

Special Issue

Much has occurred since Frithjof Bergmann‘s seminal thoughts on New Work (1994; 2004; 2019): Smartphones, virtual communication and virtual cooperation have entered the business world. Digitalization has brought forth a completely new economy, agile work processes, AI services, a digital start-up culture, cloud work, new employment relationships, leadership styles, co-working tools and an enhanced spatial and temporal flexibility. These changes in work context and job characteristics, summarized as New Work Arrangements call for a revision of work related concepts and theories. However, even in top management research outlets, the pervasive presence of technology in organizational work has been neglected (Orlikowski & Scott, 2017).

With this special issue on “New Work Arrangements”, we would like to provide comprehensive insights into the many ways in which digitalization influences how we organize, manage and learn work. We also aim to present approaches from various disciplines to incorporate characteristics of New Work Arrangements in existing theories, models, and concepts. In an attempt to categorize the various faces of New Work Arrangements and to provide a guideline for contributions to our special issue, we focus on three central aspects that are influenced by digitalization:

New Organization

Digital technologies enable new business models and strategies; however, they also come with numerous behavioural and organizaitonal challenges for firms: For instance, online markets for talent and labor allow firms to out- source complex tasks but may have implications for knowledge management and human resource management. Adoption of digital technologies may require complementary investments in rare skills to bring about the intended productivity improvements in full (Leiponen et al., 2016). Furthermore, through the advent of digital technologies, virtual work has become the new normal: Staff members work from dispersed locations and interact through their smart phones or other mobile devices (Raghuram et al., 2019). This situation poses a number of new, interesting research questions, for example:

  • What effects have agile work processes, ubiquitous working and virtual teams on an individual and organizational level?
  • What influence do digitalization and artificial intelligence solutions have on work and job characteristics as well as work engagement, performance and perceived autonomy?
  • What is the role of organizational culture and team norms in explaining the impact of New Work Arrangements?
  • Which business models are successful from both an economic (e.g. increased profit) and a psychological (e.g. meaningful work) perspective?

New Leadership

New technologies enable arrangements that offer work-life flexibility. However, studies have shown that such arrangements do not necessarily benefit all groups of workers equally and may come with new challenges, such as promotion and pay schemes (Kossek & Lautsch, 2017). Moreover, such new work arrangements may require new forms of leadership (Banks et al., 2019; Sheniger, 2019). In addition, leaders may have to deal with changes in organizational identity, practice, and knowledge that need to be overcome when organizations become more and more digitalized (Kump, 2019). Possible questions for this special issue include:

  • How are leadership and communication in the workplace affected by digitalization?
  • How can we base trends like mindful leadership, holacracy or agile project management on solid research?
  • What are appropriate competencies, tools, styles or mindsets for leaders facing New Work Arrangements?
  • How can we use digital tools and methods to transfer knowledge, support self-reflection, and foster creativity?

New Learning

Digital devices, virtual reality and other innovative technologies offer new learning opportunities for workers at their workplaces (Noe, Clarke & Klein, 2014). At the same time, managers may need dynamic managerial capabilities in order to keep up to date with constant change (Helfat & Martin, 2014). These new situations require new management skills and may benefit from novel educational settings. Accordingly, new work arrangements come with manifold research questions regarding learning, for example:

  • Which influences has digitalization on learning and development in the workplace?
  • How can digital be used media to provide self-organized learning on the job?
  • How can we foster self-responsible learning competencies and a growth-oriented mindset?
  • What effects do concepts like micro-learning, nudging, and gamification have on learning motivation and learning success?

For the special issue, we invite contributions that consider the above mentioned or related topics of New Work Arrangements, both from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Qualitative and quantitative research contributions are welcome. We also invite survey articles, best practice cases, didactical designs and book reviews.

Deadline
Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by May 31, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due November 30, 2020. The publication is scheduled for issue 3/2021. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system ‘New Work Arrangements’ as article section: http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/submit-manuscript/

Special Issue
All contributors to the seminar are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by August 30th, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due February 28th, 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 1/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using ‘SI Employee Voice’ as article section.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Ralph Kattenbach (ralph.kattenbach@ism.de)
Johannes Moskaliuk (johannes.moskaliuk@ism.de)
Barbara Kump (barbara.kump@wu.ac.at)

MREV – Call for Papers: Management in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) from Nordic and Comparative Perspectives

Guest Editors:
Simon Fietze, Martin Senderovitz, & Jesper Raalskov, University of Southern Denmark

Special Issue
SMEs play a significant role in economic development. They stimulate competition and create jobs by developing new technologies and products. However, SMEs’ are often prevented from realising their potential due to internal and external constraints. To deal with these constraints, on the one hand, international, national and regional policies support a number of initiatives to assist SMEs’ growth and development. On the other hand, the dynamic competitive landscape of the twenty-first century is highlighting an increased need for SMEs to emphasis on the managerialization of their organizational structure and processes as well as the professionalization of individuals involved in the organization to ensure long-term survival and growth.

Research on managerialization has shown, that SMEs are characterized by a lower adoption of managerial processes, because of the strong linkages between manager and company. In addition, there is a lack of management knowledge at different levels. It is commonly highlighted that the management in these firms is characterized by some degree of informality and that individual and social control systems are more suited to these enterprises, due to common shared values and languages, informal relationships etc.

In addition, decisions in SMEs are also determined by the institutional and contextual factors and in consequence how much of their potential is realised (e.g. innovation). The Nordic context and their countries’ business systems have during the last few years served as exemplary models for practitioners from business, politics and research. The Northern European countries are among the most competitive economies, have a well-developed welfare system and a large public sector. These qualities have raised an increased interest both among practitioners and scholars alike to understand the “success” mechanisms of the Nordic business systems.

Based on these considerations, the purpose of this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is to enhance our understanding of management practices in  SMEs from a Nordic and comparative perspective. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following issues:

  • What institutional conditions determine management practices in SMEs?
  • What is the role of managerial mechanisms and professional managers in SMEs and family firms’ development and growth?
  • How does social- and environmental considerations influence management practices in SMEs in a Nordic context?
  • What is the role of HR in developing management practices in SMEs?
  • How do talent management impact SMEs development and growth?

This is not an exhaustive list.

21st Nordic Conference on Small Business Research (NCSB) 2020
Since its inception in 1980 the NCSB conference has been a biannual event in the Nordic tradition characterized by an open atmosphere that encourages the exchange of ideas between researchers with research interests in the field of small business and entrepreneurship. The 2020 NCSB conference in Kolding, Denmark will continue this tradition and welcomes papers from all areas of the small business and entrepreneurship.

Special Issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies
management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary European journal publishing both qualitative and quantitative work, as well as purely theoretical papers that advances the study of management, organization, and industrial relations. Management Revue publishes articles that contribute to theory from a number of disciplines, including business and public administration, organizational behavior, economics, sociology, and psychology. Reviews of books relevant to management and organization studies are a regular feature.

All contributors to the 21st NSBC conference are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue must be submitted by September 30th, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind reviews. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due March 31st, 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 3/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system using ‘SI Management in SMEs’ as article section.

Manuscript length should not exceed 10,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 2.5 cm on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s homepage.

Hoping to hear from you!
Simon Fietze (simonf@sam.sdu.dk)
Martin Senderovitz
Jesper Raalskov

REMINDER: MREV – Call for Papers: Employee Voice and the Digitalization of Work

Guest Editors:
Simon Fietze, University of Southern Denmark
Sylvia Rohlfer, Colegio Universitario de Estudios Financieros (CUNEF), Spain
Wenzel Matiaske, Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany

Seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik (April 20-24, 2020) & Special Issue

Over the past four decades, scholars from employment relations, human resource management, organizational behaviour and labour economics have published a vast body of literature concerning employee voice (Wilkinson & Fay, 2011). Employee voice is thereby understood as the opportunity to participate in organizational decision-making and to have a say to influence the own work and the interests of managers and owners (Barry &Wilkinson, 2016) or – in the case of employee silence – to withhold these views and concerns (Morrison & Milliken, 2003). Employee voice and silence have been linked to organizational performance and the development of competitive advantage (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016) and are a key ingredient for the positive relationship between strategic human resource management and organizational performance (Wood & Wall, 2007) which also implies a link between employee voice and innovation. Employees with the opportunity to communicate individual ideas to management and to participate in decision-making give them the possibility to express ‘creative ideas and new perspectives, increasing the likelihood of innovation’ (Grant, 2013, p. 1703; Zhou & George, 2001).

Recently, scholars are paying more attention to current topics and relate them to employee voice. One stream of research is addressing the advancing technologies and consider the digital revolution and its impact on employee voice. There is no doubt that digital technology is fundamentality changing the way we do business (Mennie, 2015) and in consequence forms, tools and channels ‘voice’. The few studies on employee voice and digitalization are mainly dealing with social media at work and its opportunities for management to get in dialogue with employees. Holland, Cooper, and Hecker (2019), for instance, discuss conceptually issues and opportunities social media provides in the development of employee voice. In a similar vein, Barnes, Balnave, Thornthwaite, and Manning (2019) show how a union’s use of social media might facilitate greater member participation and engagement. However, more empirical evidence and conceptual considerations are needed to better understand and explain digitalization and employee voice (or: ‘e-voice’).

Therefore, the purpose of this seminar and the aim of the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is to focus on digitalization at work and its challenges and opportunities for employee voice and silence in cross-disciplinary discussions. Some context to discuss are listed below:

  • To what extent do technologies impact employee voice and silence?
  • To what extent do employees make use of technology to ‘raise their voice’?
  • What role do trade unions play when it comes to electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice?
  • What is the impact of electronic (e.g., social media) voice on traditional mechanisms of employee voice?
  • What is the effectiveness of electronic (e.g., social media) voice? How does it compare to the outcomes of traditional mechanisms?
  • Why do electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice systems fail?
  • What is the ‘dark side’ of electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice/silence?

Deadline
Potential contributors to the seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik are encouraged to submit an abstract of five pages before January 31st, 2020 electronically via the online submission system of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies using ‘IUC Dubrovnik’ as article section: http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/submit-manuscript/

Special Issue
All contributors to the seminar are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by August 30th, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due February 28th, 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 1/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using ‘SI Employee Voice’ as article section.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Simon Fietze
Sylvia Rohlfer
Wenzel Matiaske

References
Barnes, A., Balnave, N., Thornthwaite, L., & Manning, B. (2019). Social media: Union communication and member voice. In P. Holland, J. Teicher, & J. Donaghey (Eds.), Employee voice at work (pp. 91–111). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2820-6_5
Barry, M., & Wilkinson, A. (2016). Pro-social or pro-management? A critique of the conception of employee voice as a pro-social behaviour within organizational behaviour. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 54(2), 261–284. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjir.12114
Grant, A. M. (2013). Rocking the boat but keeping it steady: The role of emotion regulation in employee voice. Academy of Management Journal, 56(6), 1703–1723. https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2011.0035
Holland, P., Cooper, B., & Hecker, R. (2019). Social media at work: A new form of employee voice? In P. Holland, J. Teicher, & J. Donaghey (Eds.), Employee voice at work (pp. 73–89). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2820-6_4
Mennie, P. (2015). Social media risk and governance: Managing enterprise risk. London: Kogan Page.
Morrison, E. W., & Milliken, F. J. (2000). Organizational silence: A barrier to change and development in a pluralistic world. Academy of Management Review, 25(4), 706–725. https://doi.org/10.2307/259200
Wilkinson, A., & Fay, C. (2011). New times for employee voice? Human Resource Management, 50(1), 65–74. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.20411
Wood, S. J., & Wall, T. D. (2007). Work enrichment and employee voice in human resource management-performance studies. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 18(7), 1335–1372. https://doi.org/10.1080/09585190701394150
Zhou, J., & George, J. M. (2001). When job dissatisfaction leads to creativity: Encouraging the expression of voice. Academy of Management Journal, 44(4), 682–696. https://doi.org/10.5465/3069410

REMINDER: MREV – Call for Papers: Good Work: Eroding and New Standards in a Changing World

Guest Editors:
Sven Hauff, Helmut Schmidt University Hamburg
Daniela Rastetter, University of Hamburg

Special Issue
The changing context of work – e.g. though globalisation, intensification of competition, deregulation, growth in employment flexibility, technological changes, digitalization – increasingly triggers debates about the quality of working life and concerns about the well-being of employees. Observations of precarious forms of employment or increasing demands and intensification of work thereby often elicit nostalgic memories of the apparently ‘good old days’ where work was characterized by full-time employment, an adequate income, a permanent contract, and social insurance. However, these ‘old’ standards of ‘good work’ did not apply to all employees and even in the ‘good old days’, work was often characterized by strict hierarchy and low influence, where employees’ interests were largely neglected. Here, modern forms of employment could lead to improvements by providing, for example, more autonomy, involvement, flexible working hours, a better work life balance, and inclusion.

The question of how to evaluate the changes in the world of work is not easy and there are manifold perspectives how to define the standards of ‘good work’. One perspective could be to identify the work and employment conditions that are actually increasing or threatening employee well-being. A particular challenge here is to consider the different dimensions of employee well-being, which includes aspects like physical and mental health, satisfaction, engagement or fairness. Another perspective could be to confront the new developments to the aspirations and values of employees. The latter are also changing since new generations enter the labour market, since women increasingly participate in the labour force, or because migration movements lead to an increasing diversity. Finally, one could contrast the changes with the current regulations in labour and social law concerning employee protection rights, working time and wage standards, social security, and representation of employees’ interests.

In this Special Issue we want to bring together research that addresses the issue of eroding and new standards of ‘good work’ and we encourage researchers to share their thoughts with us. Contributions should address one or more of the following questions:

  • Which standards of good work erode or fade, evolve or change?
  • What are the driving forces behind these changing standards?
  • What influence do digitalisation and globalisation have on the standards of good work?
  • What standards of work are emerging in new forms of organisation such as crowd work platforms?
  • How do individual standards of good work – such as working hours, wages, health and safety, co-determination, trade union representation, or equal opportunities – develop?
  • How can new forms of HRM or business strategies like diversity management support standards of good work?
  • What effects do this change in the standards of good work have on workers and their ability to work and perform?
  • Are standards of good work developing in new fields, for example on the question of religious practice, spirituality and the search for meaning in the workplace?
  • What are the effects for companies and businesses? Which strategies do companies and businesses choose when dealing with new standards, or which strategies lead to new standards?

Deadline
Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by December 30, 2019. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a “revise and resubmit” are due June 31, 2020. The publication is scheduled for issue 2/2021. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using “SI Standards of Good Work” as article section.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Sven Hauff
Daniela Rastetter

EURAM 2020 T03_09 & MREV Special Issue – Call for Papers: Entrepreneurial Management

Track Proponents & Guest Editors:
Simon Fietze, University of Southern Denmark
Sylvia Rohlfer, Colegio Universitario de Estudios Financieros (CUNEF), Spain
Claudio Petti, University of Salento, Italy
Abderrahman Hassi, Al Akhawayn University, Morocco

To create growth and increase the effectiveness of new business venturing as well as small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) entrepreneurial management practices play a pivotal role in exploiting entrepreneurial knowledge and utilizing it towards opportunity exploitation (Goel & Jones, 2016), innovation (Hisrich & Ramadani, 2017) and talent development (Pinheiro & Stensaker, 2014). In line with this, the track addresses entrepreneurial management practices from interdisciplinary and multi-level angles as an important variable in the interplay between individual, organizational and institutional contexts. We invite empirical and conceptual research that contributes to a better understanding of behaviour and mechanisms constituting the formation and diffusion of entrepreneurial management practices. These managerial practices include a wide range of means (e.g. management structure, decision processes learning, knowledge management, human resource system) that help a firm to remain competitive and contribute to organizational and societal value creation.

According to Gupta et al. (2004), entrepreneurs need to fill entrepreneurial and leadership roles and guide the organization through change by implementing certain bundles of practices to build strong dynamic capabilities to sense and seize innovation opportunities, (introducing new products, processes or practices), to successful venture (entering new businesses) or to renew strategically (improving internal coordination; Teece, 2016). Previous research was mainly concerned with the different life cycles of new ventures and problems related to maturity (Gray & Ariss, 1985) and certain types of entrepreneurial leadership (Kim et al., 2017). Thus, a better understanding of the dynamics of entrepreneurial and managerial behaviour of entrepreneurs is crucial.

The track provides an opportunity to take stock on these developments and to present research that addresses entrepreneurial management practices in combination with related fields (e.g. dynamic capabilities, internationalization). A critical issue is a better understanding of contextual factors. Mostly “Western” theories have been applied and these theories may – to a certain degree – explain individual and organizational behaviour on a global level. However, institutional arrangements need to be considered as a driving force to explain the higher level of entrepreneurial activity in emerging economies compared to advanced markets, and, thus, the variation of entrepreneurial management practices.

European Academy of Management (EURAM) 2020
The European Academy of Management (EURAM) is a learned society founded in 2001. It aims at advancing the academic discipline of management in Europe. With members from 49 countries in Europe and beyond, EURAM has a high degree of diversity and provides its members with opportunities to enrich debates over a variety of research management themes and traditions.

Deadline for paper submission is 14 January 2020 (2pm Belgium time). Contributors are notified of acceptance on 19 March 2020. Further information about the deadlines and important other dates can be found on the EURAM homepage. Author’s guidelines and information about the submission procedure can also be found on the EURAM homepage.

Special Issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies
management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary European journal publishing both qualitative and quantitative work, as well as purely theoretical papers that advances the study of management, organization, and industrial relations. Management Revue publishes articles that contribute to theory from a number of disciplines, including business and public administration, organizational behavior, economics, sociology, and psychology. Reviews of books relevant to management and organization studies are a regular feature.

All contributors to the EURAM track are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue must be submitted by September 30th, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind reviews. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due March 31st, 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 2/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system using ‘SI Entrepreneurial Management’ as article section.

Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s homepage.

Hoping to hear from you!
Simon Fietze (simonf@sam.sdu.dk)
Sylvia Rohlfer (srohlfer@cunef.edu)
Claudio Petti (claudio.petti@unisalento.it)
Abderrahman Hassi (a.hassi@aui.ma)

MREV – Call for Papers: New Work Arrangements – A review of concepts and theories

Guest Editors:
Ralph Kattenbach, International School of Management, Hamburg
Johannes Moskaliuk, International School of Management, Stuttgart
Barbara Kump, WU Wien

Special Issue

Much has occurred since Frithjof Bergmann‘s seminal thoughts on New Work (1994; 2004; 2019): Smartphones, virtual communication and virtual cooperation have entered the business world. Digitalization has brought forth a completely new economy, agile work processes, AI services, a digital start-up culture, cloud work, new employment relationships, leadership styles, co-working tools and an enhanced spatial and temporal flexibility. These changes in work context and job characteristics, summarized as New Work Arrangements call for a revision of work related concepts and theories. However, even in top management research outlets, the pervasive presence of technology in organizational work has been neglected (Orlikowski & Scott, 2017).

With this special issue on “New Work Arrangements”, we would like to provide comprehensive insights into the many ways in which digitalization influences how we organize, manage and learn work. We also aim to present approaches from various disciplines to incorporate characteristics of New Work Arrangements in existing theories, models, and concepts. In an attempt to categorize the various faces of New Work Arrangements and to provide a guideline for contributions to our special issue, we focus on three central aspects that are influenced by digitalization:

New Organization

Digital technologies enable new business models and strategies; however, they also come with numerous behavioural and organizaitonal challenges for firms: For instance, online markets for talent and labor allow firms to out- source complex tasks but may have implications for knowledge management and human resource management. Adoption of digital technologies may require complementary investments in rare skills to bring about the intended productivity improvements in full (Leiponen et al., 2016). Furthermore, through the advent of digital technologies, virtual work has become the new normal: Staff members work from dispersed locations and interact through their smart phones or other mobile devices (Raghuram et al., 2019). This situation poses a number of new, interesting research questions, for example:

  • What effects have agile work processes, ubiquitous working and virtual teams on an individual and organizational level?
  • What influence do digitalization and artificial intelligence solutions have on work and job characteristics as well as work engagement, performance and perceived autonomy?
  • What is the role of organizational culture and team norms in explaining the impact of New Work Arrangements?
  • Which business models are successful from both an economic (e.g. increased profit) and a psychological (e.g. meaningful work) perspective?

New Leadership

New technologies enable arrangements that offer work-life flexibility. However, studies have shown that such arrangements do not necessarily benefit all groups of workers equally and may come with new challenges, such as promotion and pay schemes (Kossek & Lautsch, 2017). Moreover, such new work arrangements may require new forms of leadership (Banks et al., 2019; Sheniger, 2019). In addition, leaders may have to deal with changes in organizational identity, practice, and knowledge that need to be overcome when organizations become more and more digitalized (Kump, 2019). Possible questions for this special issue include:

  • How are leadership and communication in the workplace affected by digitalization?
  • How can we base trends like mindful leadership, holacracy or agile project management on solid research?
  • What are appropriate competencies, tools, styles or mindsets for leaders facing New Work Arrangements?
  • How can we use digital tools and methods to transfer knowledge, support self-reflection, and foster creativity?

New Learning

Digital devices, virtual reality and other innovative technologies offer new learning opportunities for workers at their workplaces (Noe, Clarke & Klein, 2014). At the same time, managers may need dynamic managerial capabilities in order to keep up to date with constant change (Helfat & Martin, 2014). These new situations require new management skills and may benefit from novel educational settings. Accordingly, new work arrangements come with manifold research questions regarding learning, for example:

  • Which influences has digitalization on learning and development in the workplace?
  • How can digital be used media to provide self-organized learning on the job?
  • How can we foster self-responsible learning competencies and a growth-oriented mindset?
  • What effects do concepts like micro-learning, nudging, and gamification have on learning motivation and learning success?

For the special issue, we invite contributions that consider the above mentioned or related topics of New Work Arrangements, both from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Qualitative and quantitative research contributions are welcome. We also invite survey articles, best practice cases, didactical designs and book reviews.

Deadline
Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by May 31, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due November 30, 2020. The publication is scheduled for issue 3/2021. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system ‘New Work Arrangements’ as article section: http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/submit-manuscript/

Special Issue
All contributors to the seminar are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by August 30th, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due February 28th, 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 1/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using ‘SI Employee Voice’ as article section.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Ralph Kattenbach (ralph.kattenbach@ism.de)
Johannes Moskaliuk (johannes.moskaliuk@ism.de)
Barbara Kump (barbara.kump@wu.ac.at)

MREV – Call for Papers: Employee Voice and the Digitalization of Work

Guest Editors:
Simon Fietze, University of Southern Denmark
Sylvia Rohlfer, Colegio Universitario de Estudios Financieros (CUNEF), Spain
Wenzel Matiaske, Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany

Seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik (April 20-24, 2020) & Special Issue

Over the past four decades, scholars from employment relations, human resource management, organizational behaviour and labour economics have published a vast body of literature concerning employee voice (Wilkinson & Fay, 2011). Employee voice is thereby understood as the opportunity to participate in organizational decision-making and to have a say to influence the own work and the interests of managers and owners (Barry &Wilkinson, 2016) or – in the case of employee silence – to withhold these views and concerns (Morrison & Milliken, 2003). Employee voice and silence have been linked to organizational performance and the development of competitive advantage (Barry & Wilkinson, 2016) and are a key ingredient for the positive relationship between strategic human resource management and organizational performance (Wood & Wall, 2007) which also implies a link between employee voice and innovation. Employees with the opportunity to communicate individual ideas to management and to participate in decision-making give them the possibility to express ‘creative ideas and new perspectives, increasing the likelihood of innovation’ (Grant, 2013, p. 1703; Zhou & George, 2001).

Recently, scholars are paying more attention to current topics and relate them to employee voice. One stream of research is addressing the advancing technologies and consider the digital revolution and its impact on employee voice. There is no doubt that digital technology is fundamentality changing the way we do business (Mennie, 2015) and in consequence forms, tools and channels ‘voice’. The few studies on employee voice and digitalization are mainly dealing with social media at work and its opportunities for management to get in dialogue with employees. Holland, Cooper, and Hecker (2019), for instance, discuss conceptually issues and opportunities social media provides in the development of employee voice. In a similar vein, Barnes, Balnave, Thornthwaite, and Manning (2019) show how a union’s use of social media might facilitate greater member participation and engagement. However, more empirical evidence and conceptual considerations are needed to better understand and explain digitalization and employee voice (or: ‘e-voice’).

Therefore, the purpose of this seminar and the aim of the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies is to focus on digitalization at work and its challenges and opportunities for employee voice and silence in cross-disciplinary discussions. Some context to discuss are listed below:

  • To what extent do technologies impact employee voice and silence?
  • To what extent do employees make use of technology to ‘raise their voice’?
  • What role do trade unions play when it comes to electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice?
  • What is the impact of electronic (e.g., social media) voice on traditional mechanisms of employee voice?
  • What is the effectiveness of electronic (e.g., social media) voice? How does it compare to the outcomes of traditional mechanisms?
  • Why do electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice systems fail?
  • What is the ‘dark side’ of electronic (e.g., social media) employee voice/silence?

Deadline
Potential contributors to the seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik are encouraged to submit an abstract of five pages before January 31st, 2020 electronically via the online submission system of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies using ‘IUC Dubrovnik’ as article section: http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/submit-manuscript/

Special Issue
All contributors to the seminar are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies. Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by August 30th, 2020. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due February 28th, 2021. The publication is scheduled for issue 1/2022. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using ‘SI Employee Voice’ as article section.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Simon Fietze
Sylvia Rohlfer
Wenzel Matiaske

References
Barnes, A., Balnave, N., Thornthwaite, L., & Manning, B. (2019). Social media: Union communication and member voice. In P. Holland, J. Teicher, & J. Donaghey (Eds.), Employee voice at work (pp. 91–111). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2820-6_5
Barry, M., & Wilkinson, A. (2016). Pro-social or pro-management? A critique of the conception of employee voice as a pro-social behaviour within organizational behaviour. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 54(2), 261–284. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjir.12114
Grant, A. M. (2013). Rocking the boat but keeping it steady: The role of emotion regulation in employee voice. Academy of Management Journal, 56(6), 1703–1723. https://doi.org/10.5465/amj.2011.0035
Holland, P., Cooper, B., & Hecker, R. (2019). Social media at work: A new form of employee voice? In P. Holland, J. Teicher, & J. Donaghey (Eds.), Employee voice at work (pp. 73–89). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2820-6_4
Mennie, P. (2015). Social media risk and governance: Managing enterprise risk. London: Kogan Page.
Morrison, E. W., & Milliken, F. J. (2000). Organizational silence: A barrier to change and development in a pluralistic world. Academy of Management Review, 25(4), 706–725. https://doi.org/10.2307/259200
Wilkinson, A., & Fay, C. (2011). New times for employee voice? Human Resource Management, 50(1), 65–74. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrm.20411
Wood, S. J., & Wall, T. D. (2007). Work enrichment and employee voice in human resource management-performance studies. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 18(7), 1335–1372. https://doi.org/10.1080/09585190701394150
Zhou, J., & George, J. M. (2001). When job dissatisfaction leads to creativity: Encouraging the expression of voice. Academy of Management Journal, 44(4), 682–696. https://doi.org/10.5465/3069410

MREV – Call for Papers: Good Work: Eroding and New Standards in a Changing World

Guest Editors:
Sven Hauff, Helmut Schmidt University Hamburg
Daniela Rastetter, University of Hamburg

Special Issue
The changing context of work – e.g. though globalisation, intensification of competition, deregulation, growth in employment flexibility, technological changes, digitalization – increasingly triggers debates about the quality of working life and concerns about the well-being of employees. Observations of precarious forms of employment or increasing demands and intensification of work thereby often elicit nostalgic memories of the apparently ‘good old days’ where work was characterized by full-time employment, an adequate income, a permanent contract, and social insurance. However, these ‘old’ standards of ‘good work’ did not apply to all employees and even in the ‘good old days’, work was often characterized by strict hierarchy and low influence, where employees’ interests were largely neglected. Here, modern forms of employment could lead to improvements by providing, for example, more autonomy, involvement, flexible working hours, a better work life balance, and inclusion.

The question of how to evaluate the changes in the world of work is not easy and there are manifold perspectives how to define the standards of ‘good work’. One perspective could be to identify the work and employment conditions that are actually increasing or threatening employee well-being. A particular challenge here is to consider the different dimensions of employee well-being, which includes aspects like physical and mental health, satisfaction, engagement or fairness. Another perspective could be to confront the new developments to the aspirations and values of employees. The latter are also changing since new generations enter the labour market, since women increasingly participate in the labour force, or because migration movements lead to an increasing diversity. Finally, one could contrast the changes with the current regulations in labour and social law concerning employee protection rights, working time and wage standards, social security, and representation of employees’ interests.

In this Special Issue we want to bring together research that addresses the issue of eroding and new standards of ‘good work’ and we encourage researchers to share their thoughts with us. Contributions should address one or more of the following questions:

  • Which standards of good work erode or fade, evolve or change?
  • What are the driving forces behind these changing standards?
  • What influence do digitalisation and globalisation have on the standards of good work?
  • What standards of work are emerging in new forms of organisation such as crowd work platforms?
  • How do individual standards of good work – such as working hours, wages, health and safety, co-determination, trade union representation, or equal opportunities – develop?
  • How can new forms of HRM or business strategies like diversity management support standards of good work?
  • What effects do this change in the standards of good work have on workers and their ability to work and perform?
  • Are standards of good work developing in new fields, for example on the question of religious practice, spirituality and the search for meaning in the workplace?
  • What are the effects for companies and businesses? Which strategies do companies and businesses choose when dealing with new standards, or which strategies lead to new standards?

Deadline
Full papers for this special issue of management revue – Socio-Economic Studies must be submitted by December 30, 2019. All contributions will be subject to double-blind review. Papers invited to a “revise and resubmit” are due June 31, 2020. The publication is scheduled for issue 2/2021. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system at http://www.mrev.nomos.de/ using “SI Standards of Good Work” as article section.

Submission Guidelines
Manuscript length should not exceed 8,000 words (excluding references) and the norm should be 30 pages in double-spaced type with margins of about 3 cm (1 inch) on each side of the page. Further, please follow the guidelines on the journal’s website (http://www.mrev.nomos.de/guidelines/).

Hoping to hear from you!
Sven Hauff
Daniela Rastetter