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Invitation to 6 Doctoral Scholarships with a maximum duration of 3 years, beginning 1 October 2017

The Institute for Employment Research (IAB) and the School of Business and Economics of the
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU) offer a joint doctoral programme in labour market
research (GradAB), which prepares graduates for a career in academics and in policy consulting.
IAB and FAU jointly constitute one of the most important hubs for labour market research in
Germany and provide optimal conditions for more than 200 labour market researchers from
different disciplines to conduct high-quality academic research.

  • The Graduate Center GradAB offers a three-year programme of high-level training in
    labour market research, which can be extended for another year under certain conditions.
  • Doctoral students benefit from a professional research and policy-consulting environment
    in one of the key institutions advising high-ranking social policymakers.
  • The course programme provides training on labour market research, methods, and data at an advanced level and is held in English.
  • The GradAB works closely together with its partners from a large network of renowned
    national and international universities, research and policy institutions.
  • The scholarship offers financial support of 1,350€ / month. In addition, funding is
    available for participation in scientific conferences and further training.
  • Scholarship holders are granted access to the IAB’s unique data resources on employment
    and social security (administrative and survey data).

We invite applications from outstanding graduates in the fields of economics, sociology or other social sciences who hold a master’s degree or diploma and have a strong interest in labour market research.

For further information on the programme, admission requirements, and the application process, please see our website www.iab.de/en/gradab.

Please submit your application in English by 31 March 2017 to:
Dr Sandra Huber
E-mail: sandra.huber@iab.de

Experimental Economics

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course instructor: : Prof. Dr. Markus Nöth (Universität Hamburg)

Date: block course:

April 7 th, 2017: 8:15am-5:00pm (10*45min)
May 5th, 2017: 8:15am-1:00pm (6*45min)
June 2nd, 2017: 8:15am-5:00pm (10*45min)
June 21st, 2017: 6:00pm-7:30pm (2*45min)

Room: tbd (Moorweidenstraße 18, Von-Melle-Park 5 (ExpLab))

Course Value: 2 SWS or 4 LP

Teaching language: English

Registration: Send an email to markus.noeth@uni-hamburg.de until March 17th, 2017; please indicate if you prefer some specific topics to be covered.

Course Overview:
The main goal of this course is to give an introduction to the design and implementation of both laboratory and field experiments in various fields of Economics and Business Administration. PhD students who have some experience with or who consider to set up an experiment are welcome to participate in this course. First, we will identify different research questions for a laboratory or a field experiment. Second, based on a literature review (for some research fields that are proposed by the participants) an experimental design is developed and a pilot experiment will be set up and run in class. As part of this exercise, students will learn the basic requirements of a human subjects committee.

Topics:

  • Identify a suitable research question for an experiment
  • Ethical and scientific standards: historical and scientific reasons, consent requirements, human subjects committee, special requirements (children, elderly people, inmates, …), data collection and evaluation
  • Individual and group experiments in the laboratory
  • Surveys and internet experiments
  • Field experiments in cooperation with a company

General literature:

  • Kagel, John H., and Alvin E. Roth, 1995, The Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton/Oxford
  • Gerber, Alan S., and Donald P. Green, 2012, Field Experiments, W.W. Norton & Company, London/New York.
  • Kagel, John H., and Alvin E. Roth, 2015, The Handbook of Experimental Economics Volume 2, Princeton University Press, Princeton/Oxford

Assessment:

  • Paper presentation (May 5th)
  • experiment design presentation (extended summary on economic question, relevant literature, hypotheses, design: presentation with max. 10 slides or max. five pages extended abstract)
  • running a pilot experiment is optional

Arbeitsbedingungen deutscher Promovierender (Working conditions of German Ph.D. students)

Dear fellow doctoral students/candidates,

We, that is Iris Koch and Paul Goldmann, examine as part of our doctoral studies how the university environment affects us doctoral candidates. It would be great if you support our studies by taking part in a 4-waves longitudinal study! This will take approximately 10-15 min per wave. Please be ensured that all your data will be treated anonymously and confidentially. To take part, please follow the link http://ww2.unipark.de/uc/promovierende_0/ and fill out the German questionnaire (there is no English version).

If you would like to support us even further, please share our study with your fellow colleagues who also are working on their PhD thesis. In case there are any questions, please feel free to contact us writing a mail to umfrage.auopsych@uni-bamberg.de.

Thanks for your support and best wishes,
Iris and Paul

Further informtion

University of Hamburg: Introduction to Research in Closed-Loop Supply Chains

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course instructor: : Prof. Gilvan Souza (Kelley School of Business, Indiana University)

Date: June 16th 2017, 09:00-13:00 h  (block course)

Room: tba

Course Value: 1 LP

Teaching language: English

Registration: Please register via email to stefanie.nonnsen@uni-hamburg.de

Course Overview:
This course will provide an overview of research and tools used in closed-loop supply chain management research in operations management. A closed-loop supply chain is a supply chain with flows of products post-consumer use from consumers to retailers, manufacturers, and/or suppliers. Examples include consumer returns, and post-lease products. Emphasis will be given to strategic decision-making, such as product line extension, choice of product quality, and take-back legislation.

Course Contents:

  • An overview to closed-loop supply chains (CLSCs): types of product returns, and types of disposition decisions.
  • Examples of strategic, tactical and operational decisions in CLSCs
  • Strategic decision 1: Should an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) offer a remanufactured product in its product line?
    • Monopoly pricing for a single product, and for a vertically differentiated product line under linear demand curves and constant marginal costs
    • The fundamental trade-off: Market expansion vs. cannibalization
    • Extension: non-linear demand curves
    • Competition between an OEM and a third-party remanufacturer
  • Strategic decision II: What is the optimal product quality when there is product recovery in the form of remanufacturing and/or recycling?
    • Introduction to classical quality choice models without product recovery (Mussa and Rosen, 1978)
    • Quality choice with product recovery: monopoly (Atasu and Souza 2013)
    • Quality choice with product recovery: competition between an OEM and a third-party remanufacturer (Orsdemir et al. 2014)
  • Strategic decision III: Design of optimal take-back legislation from a policy maker’s perspective, and an OEM’s response to it
    • The concept of welfare and its components: firms’ profits plus consumer surplus minus environmental impact
    • The model by Atasu and Van Wassenhove (2009)
  • Incentives and coordination in CLSCs
    • Reducing consumer returns through retailer effort (Ferguson, Guide, and Souza, 2006)
  • Overview of tactical decision making in CLSCs
    • Production planning for remanufactured products: product acquisition, grading, and disposition decisions
    • Hybrid inventory systems

Prerequisites: Background in Operations and Supply Chain Management is preferred but not absolutely necessary.

Assessment: Participation in discussion

University of Hamburg: HCHE Research Seminar and PhD Course 24 to 25 April 2017

Institution: Hamburg Center for Health Economics (HCHE)

Course instructor: Professor Mike Drummond, Professor of Health Economics and former Director of the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York

Date: 24-25 April 2017

Time:

  • 24 April: arrival of Prof. Mike Drummond, individual meetings (please ask for an appointment: andrea.buekow@uni-hamburg.de)
  • 24 April, 4:30 pm: HCHE Research Seminar Title: Where politics and economics collide: the case of orphan drugs
  • 25 April, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm: PhD Course Title: Methodological and Policy Issues in Economic Evaluation

Place: HCHE, Esplanade 36

  • HCHE Research Seminar: Rooms 4011/13
  • PhD Course: Rooms 4030/31

Credit Points: 1 SWS/2 LP (Universität Hamburg)

Teaching language: English

Registration for the PhD Course:  andrea.buekow@uni-hamburg.de, no later than 14 April 2017

University of Hamburg: Statistical Analysis of Big Data

Institution: Universität Hamburg, Fakultät für Betriebswirtschaft

Course instructor: Prof. Martin Spindler (UHH)

Date: Semester course, Time: T or W, 8-10am

Place: tba

Course value: 2 SWS or 4 LP

Course overview:
The main goal of this course is to give an introduction to statistical methods for the analysis of big data. Recently developed methods are discussed, in particular various methods of machine learning are presented and basic concepts for the analysis of big data are introduced. The course is based on the recent book by Efron and Hastie (2016).

Reference: Efron, B. and T. Hastie. Computer Age Statistical Inference. Cambridge University Press 2016.

Teaching language: English

Student evaluation: paper presentation/presentation of a chapter of the book

Registration: by email to martin.spindler@uni-hamburg.de

Reminder – MREV – Call for Papers – Corporate responsibility: In the dilemma between trust and fake?

Seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik (April 3-7, 2017) & Special Issue

Seminar Organizers & Guest Editors:
Simon Fietze, University of Southern Denmark
Wenzel Matiaske, Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg (Germany)
Roland Menges, Technical University Clausthal (Germany)

Trust is the currency that creates markets. This is knowledge of the merchants at the latest since modern markets have emerged along the medieval trade routes. Quality and reliability in the business are also building blocks of trust and the assumption of responsibility for the social and ecological consequences of entrepreneurial activity. Whether the latter should be integrated into social and legal relations and norms in the form of voluntary corporate responsibility, has been the subject of economic discussion since the beginnings of the discipline and since the separation of the spheres of economic and moral action in the Scottish moral economy.

Over the past decades, both supra-national organizations such as the UN and the EU have been focusing on soft law – from the global compact through the AA1000 to the Green Paper of the EU Commission – as well as the national states, to promote social and environmental responsibility for companies in the age of globalization. These initiatives have led to lively activities and debates both in the business world and in different scientific disciplines. For companies, it has now become a “fashion” to campaign social and ecological responsibility using the concept of “Corporate Social Responsibility”. This commitment has meanwhile led to the fact that CSR activities should partly contribute to value creation instead of aligning them with corporate objectives and values. Such a development leads to the loss of trust and the assumption of responsibility becomes a “fake”.

Against this backdrop, some of the social and economic observers remained skeptical, advocating tougher legal norms or fiscal implications. Finally, lawyers pointed out that (successful) standardizations often develop not only from the “top”, but also from the “bottom”, i.e. they emerge from the action routines of the economic actors as emergent effects. However, not only the recent scandals – from the ENRON case to the VW case – raise questions about the effectiveness of co-operative self-commitment as well as external control.

Moreover, corporate responsibility is related to the concept of consumer responsibility. Whereas market-optimists believe that reliable changes in consumption patterns rely on responsible individual action, more market-skeptics warn of a counterproductive “privatization of sustainability”.

In this light, this year’s seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik will be on theoretical and empirical contributions to the topic “Corporate responsibility: In the dilemma between trust and fake?” from economic, sociological, (economic) historical and legal perspectives. Possible topics are:

  • Economic and history of ideas cases and questions of corporate responsibility
  • The “pseudo” corporate responsibility
  • Organizational and sociological theories and findings on corporate responsibility
  • Theory and empiricism of the audit
  • Theoretical and empirical studies on consumer responsibility
  • Criminal law considerations for corporate actors
  • Institutional factors of corporate responsibility
  • The trust of social entrepreneurship
  • This is not an exhaustive list.

Deadline
Potential contributors to the seminar at the IUC Dubrovnik are encouraged to submit an abstract of 1-2 pages before February 28th, 2017 electronically via online submission system of Management Revue using ‘IUC Dubrovnik’ as article section: http://www.management-revue.org/submission/

All contributors to the seminar are invited to submit their paper for the special issue of Management Revue. Full papers must be submitted by July 31st, 2017. All contributions will be subject to a double-blind review. Papers invited to a ‘revise and resubmit’ are due October 31st, 2017. Please submit your papers electronically via the online submission system using ‘SI Corporate Responsibility’ as article section.

Hoping to hear from you!
Simon Fietze
Wenzel Matiaske
Roland Menges

The GIGA Doctoral Programme invites applications from prospective doctoral students to join the programme on 1 October 2017

The GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies / Leibniz-Institut für Globale und Regionale Studien is an independent social-science research institute based in Hamburg. It analyses political, social and economic developments in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East and links them to questions of global significance. The GIGA combines this analysis with innovative comparative research in the fields of Accountability and Participation, Peace and Security, Growth and Development, and Power and Ideas across multiple levels of analysis. The GIGA Doctoral Programme is a three-year structured programme for junior academics, in which they can pursue their research and professional development, particularly in the field of comparative area studies (CAS). We strongly welcome international applications.

Please find the Call and further information regarding the application process on our website: https://www.giga-hamburg.de/de/dp/application/fellow

The deadline for applications is 1 February 2017.

Call for Papers: BAM2017 – Re-connecting management research with the disciplines: Shaping the research agenda for the social sciences

In the 30 years since the establishment of BAM, the field of management has become more mature, however, the social sciences in general are much more mature, and as such may be deemed to have a first mover advantage. For example, economics, psychology, social anthropology and sociology were recognized as distinct social sciences and established key publications and academic journals to disseminate their research in the 19th century. By comparison, management as an academic discipline was not recognized until the 20th century, well after these other disciplines. Furthermore, the social sciences also have a longer history of producing PhDs – some of whom became the founding scholars of the management community. This may have a number of effects, including the fact that many management scholars today have PhDs in non-management disciplines. The process of research training (in social science departments) institutionalizes the student into the core discipline (or field) that may have enduring effects. A second major factor that is perhaps limiting the ability of management to influence the related social sciences may be perceptions of its nature as ‘applied’ or bounded to a greater extent than others. We might expect to find that management imports theory from related social sciences, empirically tests the theory, and then exports the results back to the social sciences (and to practitioners), leading to export through applied journals (such as Journal of Applied Psychology). Any major developments in theory, however, would be expected to be most often developed in the social sciences, because developing theories that have general application is a primary element of their activity. On the other hand, management scholars who develop theory would be focused on business applications, which may result in theory that is not of general interest to the social sciences and, hence, less likely to be exported. If management is inherently applied, we might draw parallels with the relationship between management and the related social sciences and the relationship between medicine and the natural sciences. John Kay has argued the following: “In the last fifty years, the application of scientific method to medical subjects, and the development and adoption of knowledge gained in physics, chemistry and biology, has transformed their (doctors’) effectiveness. (However) Medicine remains a practical subject.” Therefore, it may be a perfectly natural state of affairs that management imports from the core social sciences, much the same way as medicine has done from physics, chemistry, and biology. However, some business schools are bucking the trend, and are moving into being at the forefront of debates by re-connecting with the social sciences. Alternatives to the ‘pure’ and ‘applied’ metaphor of research include questioning whether the social science of any field (e.g. religion, social movements, politics, law, science etc.) are any more or less applied than any other, questioning whether there is any such thing as ‘applied’ research and the adoption of other epistemologies and methodologies which disrupt such frameworks of thought.

These issues will be explored at the Conference, fittingly to be hosted by Warwick Business School, where the first BAM Conference was held 30 years ago.

Further information